Alice Paul Essay

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Alice Paul was an American suffragist that was born into a Quaker family in New Jersey in 1885 (NWHM). She fought actively for the rights of women during the 1920’s. The topic of women’s suffrage was not new to Alice Paul because her mother took her to women’s suffrage meeting during her childhood (NWHM). Her mother was the one that had influenced her to fight for these beliefs. Although not always successful, Paul spent years working towards the goal of equality for men and women.
Paul went through much schooling before taking part as a women’s suffrage. In 1912, she joined the National American Woman Suffrage Association to fight for a change to the 19th Amendment (NWHM). Soon after, they founded the National Woman’s Party to help to speak out their beliefs (NWHM). Paul’s first step to fight for women’s right to vote was by organizing the largest parade that had ever taken place in Washington D.C. (NWHM). The parade took place the night before the inauguration of President Woodrow Wilson on March 3, 1913 (NWHM). About eight thousand women took part in
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Paul was a middle class woman. She had escaped the social norms of women by becoming a suffragist by fighting for her beliefs. By leading the marches and rallies, there was an increase in her social standing because of the supporters she got while doing so. When the 19th Amendment was ratified, her social standing rose once again because she was able to accomplish her goal and change the lives of all women in the United States. As time progressed, women looked at her as a powerful woman in that she had changed the perspective of others of the impact that one person can have on society. Her desire for equality allowed her to become notable and become a chairman of a women’s society. Even though Paul was not able to see the Equal Rights Amendment pass, people today still look at her as one of the most notable women’s suffragists to

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