Alfred Hitchcock Jump Scares Analysis

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Jump scares are useful tool designed to provoke fear based on our instinctive reflexes to respond to surprise sudden movements. Sound and musical changes are often accompanied with jump scares to create a spooky mood and atmosphere. Below are ten of the most effective jump scares used in some of the scariest horror movies of all time!

1. Psycho (1960) - The old classics are often the scariest, absent of CGI and modern technology that leaves the filmmaker to rely on other devices, such as music, super talented actors, and the ambiance, mood, and tone of the film, overall. Alfred Hitchcock produces one of the most notable jump scares of all time with Marion's scene in the shower when she is being stabbed by Norman, who is of course, acting on behalf of, "Mother".

I'm pretty sure Janet Lee gets the jump scare, scream
…show more content…
The best asset to the spooky atmosphere in this film is the house and its grounds. Everything contained in the home, especially it's toy collection are freaky down to every light and shadow played off the objects and the house.

3. Drag Me to Hell (2009) - Drag Me to Hell is a very good example of a terrifying contemporary American horror movie. Differing from both Psycho and the Woman in Black, it's atmosphere varies, but the looming dread of guilt and jump scares that come absolutely out of nowhere with no warning are excellent assets to this unique modern film.

However, though the guilt concept might seem new and unique, this story parallels the M.R. James short story, "Casting the Runes", which was adapted into the 1957 British horror film, "Night of the Demon". Various elements of Drag Me to Hell are drawn from Night of the Demon, such as the 3-day curse theme and similar types of

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