Alfred Adler's Theory Of Personality

1429 Words 6 Pages
Personality, everybody has one and everyone is unique in their own personality. Every individual is different, but the question is why? Personality is one of the most important assets that an individual possesses. Personality will be a determining factor in a person’s level of contentment in life, their success and their motivation to fulfill their life desires. Personality helps shape the present and continue to shape an individual’s future. The core of understanding human nature lies in the study of personality. Psychologists through the years have been studying personality, not to learn about the most obvious characteristics of the individual, but to explain what the driving forces are that shape an individual’s behavior or personality. …show more content…
The assumption of Adler’s individual psychology is that social factors and goals for the future are the motivating factors for human behavior. Individual psychology also makes the assumption that individuals are conscious of their thoughts and feelings and are personally responsible for how they respond or behave in a given situation. (Journal of Individual Psychology, 2013).Alfred Adler contributions to the theory of personality centered on the importance of society. Adler felt that as humans, individuals are all connected together and through that connectedness, one cannot do anything without it affecting society as a whole. (Journal of individual psychology, 2013). Adler’s goal as a therapist was not concentrated so much on the individual’s issues for the purpose of just the patient but also to contribute to the health of society. To Adler, strengthening society is what was needed for individual survival. As an end product of caring for society, the individual is cared for by society (Journal of Individual Psychology, …show more content…
Maslow stated his purpose in this being that “Freud supplied to us the sick half of psychology and we must now fill it out with the healthy half” (Maslow, 1999, p.7). Maslow believed that humans were motivated by needs and goals. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is typically demonstrated in the form of a pyramid. This pyramid shows lower lever needs such as food and shelter as being more physiological and the higher level needs are more toward the end of self-actualization and are psychological. These are the needs that tend to develop as the individual ages and less related into needs that are pertinent to survival (Humanistic Psychologist, 2013). The needs that Maslow places on the lower level of the pyramid have a much higher significance to the survival of man as people are undoubtedly going to fulfill the need for food and shelter before seeking out psychological needs such as love and belongingness. (Aging International,

Related Documents