Albert Camus 'An Analysis Of Rene Descartes's Sisyphus'

1932 Words 8 Pages
The philosopher Albert Camus paints and bleak picture of the human existence, saying that our lives have no meaning and are, as a consequence absurd, because all our efforts are futile and hopeless. However, if we can accept that choice is intrinsic to a thinking being, then we can admit to ourselves that everything we do, no matter how insignificant, possesses some meaning and it gives our existence purpose. There are two certainties in life deduced by the thinking of Rene Descartes; one is that we are a thinking mind and the other is that we exist. I want to extend this thinking further to include the obligation to choose, find what is sufficient for purpose and meaning and conclude that we have enough in our current conditions. If we are …show more content…
In said story, our fictional hero Sisyphus, as a consequence of his defiance towards the gods, is condemned to moving a giant bolder up a mountain, just to see it fall again upon accomplishment, repeating the ordeal for the rest of eternity. As we come to find out, this punishment is tailor-made for our hero, who among other things, tricked and escaped the grip of death and rose to the living world from which he came from and defiantly went on the run because he was unwilling to forgo the warm and pleasant earth again. The situation becomes tragic once Sisyphus realizes the absurdity of his endless fate but, once against defiant, the wisest and most prudent of mortals chooses instead to not be defeated, accepts the absurdity and finds joy from …show more content…
Rene Descartes distrusted his world, not because of lack of meaning, but because there was no base reasoning that could substantiate reality. To illustrate his doubt, he proposed a thought experiment where an evil entity (you can watch The Matrix movie for a modern version of this experiment) feeds your mind illusions of your entire existence; your friends, your home, your body, everything created with evil magic. The point of the experiment is not to prove the existence of such being, but to illuminate our impotence against such a being and his evil tricks-we can t prove that such being is playing tricks on us and simulating all the objects and people we know. Famously, Descartes figured out Cogito, ergo sum or I think therefore, I am and from that conclusion he knew he had found a structure from which he could build all his other ideas. From the same train of thought we can arrive to another fundamental, we are thinking minds, we exist, and we choose. From those three fundamentals of our existence we can find meaning in everything we

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