The Imitation Game Analysis

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In an interview with director Morten Tyldum and screenwriter Graham Moore, host Hank Green brought up many questions toward the accuracy and inaccuracy in regards to the scientific and historical aspect to their movie The Imitation Game, which Tyldum responds that “scientific discoveries (history) happens over time in life, but we have to make moments, and movie making (Hollywood) is all about moments” (“Alan Turing and The Imitation Game”). According to Tyldum, one goal is to make the movie “understandable and engaging to the viewers,” something that Hollywood films tend to do by twisting the traditional history lesson in hopes of capturing the purpose in a short time with its eureka and epiphany moments for viewers to relate. More often …show more content…
Stationed at Bletchley Park in Hut 8, he is accompanied by his fellow cryptologists and colleague Joan Clarke, who is played by Keira Knightley. 'Enigma ' was a highly complex device used by the Nazi Germans to send encrypted code messages throughout the world prior and during World War II. The device was so instrumental to Hitler 's early dominance because nobody except the Germans knew how to read and decipher the messages during the early folds of the …show more content…
For example, people tend to not realize that Martin Luther King’s march for African-American freedom came from the idea of Gandhi’s struggle for Indian independence. The fact that M.L.K rarely spoke of Gandhi and the major influence he had on what King wished to replicate demonstrates the lack of knowledge the American people knew back then. Like in today’s generation, the audience watching these Hollywood blockbusters most of the time do not possess the historical knowledge or dig deep enough into their research and find the faults within the history of the movie they are watching. We, humans, are lazy subjects who believe too much of what is shown on the screen, believing all these so-called true “facts” and without understanding the difference in the film and history itself. Other than the central focus that scriptwriters do by portraying one person in history as the main protagonist, most will never know the detrimental contributions made by Gordon Welchman, Dilly Knox, Stewart Menzies, Joan Clarke,etc. towards breaking ‘Enigma.’ There is a phrase in the film that Alan Turing says to Joan Clarke, “Sometimes it’s the people no one imagines anything of who do the things that no one can imagine.” In essence, it stands as a reminder that we should never underestimate people and judge another 's abilities before seeing it. It also indicates how we

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