Agrarian Reform In Brazil Case Study

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Report and analyze the article in regard to the implications of Agrarian reform and land distribution in Brazil. …show more content…
But the abundance and availability of cheap money along with the promotion of soybean have generated large surpluses for export. Consequently all these factors associated have led to the absorption of rural small holdings by medium and large properties: in fact, soybean cultivation requires large areas of cultivable lands, in addition the availability of credit facilitated the acquisition of larger areas. Therefore one, who owned more land, received more credit and more land he could buy in return. The overall economy grew strongly and in such a short time the country has rapidly urbanized and industrialized, without having to democratize without landownership or develop domestic market in rural areas. The proposed land reform has vanished as a crisis, and the distribution of land and income concentration has remained intact. Even at the dawn of a new century, Brazil has not yet found a solution to the agrarian problem which dates back to the 16th century. As indicated by www.planalto.gov.br retrieved on August 9th …show more content…
In effect the meager changes made at the high concentration of ownership land since the mid-century have created in the early 80s conflicts over landownership that intensified in the northern part of the country. This situation resulted in the creation of the Special Ministry for Property Issues, which has managed during the 1964-84 periods to resettle per year an average of 6,000 families. As indicated in www.fao.org only 3.4 million expropriation were made for the past three years and account globally for less than 2% of the area needed to settle all the landless families. In 1985, the government of President José Sarney prepared the National Agrarian Reform Plan that was authorized in the Land Statute. The plan's goals were extremely ambitious: the resettlement of 1,400,000 families over a five-year period. However, the five-year plan succeeded in resettling only about 90,000 families. In the 1980s, the organized social movements defending agrarian reform made a great deal of progress and the state agencies responsible for landed property issues grew in size and strength. Almost every Brazilian state had such an agency and, overall, state-level measures benefited almost as many families as did those of the federal government.

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