Agent Orange In Vietnam

1267 Words 6 Pages
As part of the Vietnam war, the U.S. military sprayed 12.1 gallons of Agent Orange defoliant on trees and vegetation in Vietnam. This so-called toxic chemical is mixed with other varieties of herbicides used for removing trees and dense tropical foliage that provided cover the Vietnam troops. Much of agent orange contains dioxin, which is a highly dangerous and toxic chemical, known to cause “reproductive and developmental problems, disruption of the immune system, interference with hormones and cancer,” according to World Health Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. The U.S. Department of Defense developed these tactical herbicides specifically to be used in “combat operations.” …show more content…
Tan Dong and Vo Thi Nham have two boys who have been born with birth defects associated with agent orange. The youngest son, Tan Hau, has a disability in which he is unable to walk on his own and has uncontrollable arm and leg movements. As for their oldest son, Tan Tri, he can’t walk, crawl, or turn over on his own. He struggles with kyphosis, an abnormally curved spine and convex-shaped ribs. Majority of the time, he has to be carried by his mother, Vo Thi Nham, to travel in the house from corner to corner. Due to their sons conditions, Tan Dong’s wife must stay home to care to them. She explains, “when I get up in the morning, I carry them out to the yard and help them with a little exercise, then carry them back in the house to eat.” With the toxic chemicals being everywhere in crops, water, forests, and land, millions of Vietnamese civilians including adults and children suffer from cancer, diabetes, birth defects, and other …show more content…
These victims think about their loved ones and how their illnesses affect the next generation and the following generation. According to Agent Orange Record, a non-profit organization that works to address the long-term health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of war, Do Duc Diu, a father of 15 children with 12 dead, stated “I have no future. No happiness.” Even with the ideas of funding and holding charities for those who are in need of medical care, it won’t be enough to cover the costs. “Funding is not always stable,” said Dinh Van Tuyen, vice director of the Friendship Village, a boarding school for 120 affected youth in Hanoi. “There is financial support for Agent Orange victims but it is not enough to improve their lives.” Tuyen also added that children who suffer from less severe disorders can be helped at the village. Understanding the pain that these people has to suffer with shows how difficult life is with the consequences from the Vietnam war. It is almost as if victims are trapped in a prison but with no gated area because they have the inability to do normal activity and thus, have to live with pain for the rest of their

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