Agenda For Change Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… The importance of lifelong learning was recognised as being pivotal in addressing these issues (Jones and Jenkins, 2007: 10). It introduced a four-tier structure, incorporating a competency based system for continual learning, the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF); this provided fair CPD access to all (Gould et al, 2007: 27). Within the imaging department it promoted, encouraged and expedited role development and generated new radiographic roles (Woodford, 2005: 321). It was highlighted that in order to meet service needs and radiographer aspirations role development was necessary (Woodford, 2005: 320). It provided improvements in equal opportunities, career development with improved CPD opportunities; and consequently increased morale and retention rates (DH, 2004: 2). However, Williamson and Mundy (2009: 46) suggest that if role development and career aspirations did not materialise the investment in recruitment, retention and improved morale would be wasted. As a consequence a depleted workforce and lack of service provision, could potentially compromise patient safety (Gibbs, 2011: …show more content…
This affords further opportunities within the profession and is integral to the extension of professional roles and boundaries; complying with current drives for service improvement (Williamson and Mundy, 2009: 41). Woodford (2005: 321) states ‘double barium contrast enema was one example of role extension benefitting service to patients by reducing long waiting lists and numbers of unreported examinations’. The evaluated studies established better service provision, for example patient waiting times; freeing up radiologists time to perform other duties, and cost effectiveness (Woodford, 2005: 325). However, Smith and Reeves (2010: 113) state that there were barriers to adopting radiographic role-extension from radiologists, who hindered the radiographer’s progression. This suggests that intent from radiographers and government to achieve improved patient services can be impeded without the support and co-operation of radiologists who are central to the radiographic team and necessary to implement the changes (Woodford, 2005: …show more content…
Public confidence in service provision and professional progression is maintained through compulsory CPD which ensures that lifelong learning is maintained and based on up to date evidence (SCoR, 2008: 5). There are numerous accredited courses documented currently within the NHS; in addition to innovative and accessible CPD activities being readily available within imaging departments; helping increase uptake. The success of CPD stems from knowing what is to be achieved, implementing an appropriate strategy for undertaking the activity and post evaluation (HPC, 2006: 4). This must be coupled with a commitment from all professionals involved in its planning and application taking responsibility and recognising their contribution for its successful outcome, which ultimately enables delivery and maintenance of a high quality patient-centred care (Williamson and Mundy, 2009:

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