Age Of Enlightenment Dbq Analysis

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Advancement in a society is paramount to the progression of mankind. During the Age of Enlightenment, a group of brilliant scholars known as philosophes came together to discover the laws of nature. They sought to improve societal living. The Age of Enlightenment, also known as the Age of Reason, ranging from the 17th to 18th century, was a period of high intellect and new ideas. While each philosophe expressed a different area of concern in relation to the society, they all expressed a central theme of freedom and equality that will improve the government, ensure harmony, religious wise, and allow for the blossom of the economy and equality between both sexes. John Locke, an English Philosopher, strongly believed in equality among men. Born …show more content…
Born in Paris 1694, he become a very dedicated writer. Composing literary works like poems, novels, essays, plays, and over 20,000 personal letters. Her area of concern was in regards to the lack of religious freedom in France. Published in 1726, in his letter, Letter Concerning the English Nation, he was praising London for their religious toleration. He takes the Royal Exchange as an example. Various nations are represented there for the benefit of mankind, his way to stating that without the numerous religious allowed in England “the government would become arbitrary” (Doc B). Meaning that the decision made would be made based on how they would benefit a specific part alone rather than how it would benefit an entire community. He also argued that the two religions would only lead to generate disputes (Doc B). She advocates that religious freedom would create a more peaceful and coherent society.
Adam Smith tackles one of the most essential things that could make or break a society, the economy. Smith argues that the government is actually limiting man’s free will. He discusses that without the government “Every man…is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest in his own way…” (Doc C). His stance on government is similar to that of John Locke, as in they both feel that the government power should be reduced, and the influence of the people should

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