After Death In Percy Bysshe Shelley's Literature

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Percy Bysshe Shelley Research Paper
Percy Bysshe Shelley’s works reveal the major theme in nineteenth century Romanism that love is the most precious gift of human being in the world. Shelley also illustrates another theme of after death. In Love’s Philosophy, Shelley uses personification and metaphor to express love; In Ozymandias, Shelley demonstrate the idea of after death; The theme that fighting for life is still appearing in modern artistic forms, for instance, Viva La Vida.
The dominant English movement during eighteenth century is Romanticism, which lead to literary rebellion at early nineteenth century Europe. As one of the pioneers who want to rebuilt a new form of Romanticism, Shelley’s work is filled with mad and love. “This new interest in relatively unsophisticated but overtly emotional literary expressions of the past was to be a dominant note in Romanticism”(Webster). Throughout Shelley’s life, he was seeking for literary expressions include freedom, strong personality and human natures.
Percy Bysshe Shelley was born in a wealthy English family which educated him as a successful, talented young poet, and Shelley was passionate in writing poetry during his entire life. “Shelley was educated at Eton and at Oxford University… In 1811,
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Similar to Realism, Shelley uses metaphor in his works and express an idea of fighting for freedom and be brave to death, which reflects working class rebellions later during industrial period. Hollingsworth describes Realism as “With few exceptions, the twentieth century's consequential ideas of metaphor may be classified as Romantic...the notion that symbolic activity gives human beings access to supernatural knowledge and being” (Hollingsworth) . Also, The theme that fighting for freedom still appearing in modern

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