African American Music Style

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African-Americans created a unique style of music that has played an integral part of American culture and shaped the development of African-American life for many decades. \Throughout U.S. history, the music scene has been a unique one compared to other countries, due in large part to the influence of African-American artists whose music reflects their struggles and triumphs. One only needs to browse through the albums of such African-American musical artists to see the creative talent and cultural impact they have created throughout the years. These historical giants created a unique style of music that has played an integral part of American culture and shaped the development of African-American life for many decades.These musical influences …show more content…
Blues music is a famous African-American music, and it has an excellent in its performance; the performance of the blues has a high level of versatility, and that it may be one of the reasons that blues became popular. This unique style has what led the blues to become famous (The History of African­-American Music 2). Blues also has a distinctive feature that can be easier to recognize in other types of music, those features such as its exciting rhythms, interacting beats, and periodic chords, which can make the whole music have continuous changes (The Blues: Lesson Plan 5). Next, the blues have a simple structure because it only contains three main chords, called the twelve bar blues. In blues music, the main message is expressed twice in repeated phrase and then responded to on a third line, which makes blues’ character more impressive than others (The History of African­-American Music …show more content…
It shows that African-Americans were in a severe environment during 20th Century, such as decaying neighborhoods, vicious murders, and police brutality. They need a way to demonstrate their desire for the society. So, Rap, a kind of music with a lot of words and beats, is a way to depict their hardship (The History of African­-American Music 4). On the other hand, the things they are trying to express is African-American suffers unequal treatment in their life, like the economic and political inequalities between whites and African-American. Then they use Rap to express their anger to the unfair society (The History of African-­American Music 4). Because of racial discrimination, African-American use Rap performance, which is intense and powerful, to eliminate the inequality between races. Rap is a form of music that hard to understand, and other people cannot fully understand the lyrics of Rap; the bass in Rap also shows their dissatisfaction with the African-American (African American Music: Rap

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