Arguments In Favor Of Vaccination

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As of 2014, 18.7 million infants have not received their basic vaccines (“Immunization” 1). This number has led to an increasing rate of susceptibility to vaccine-preventable diseases in some areas of the world. Subsequently, the population loses herd immunity, a condition when a majority of a community is immunized against a disease (Brunson 4). If that condition is achieved, the members of the community would be protected from an outbreak (Vaccines.gov 1). Furthermore, even though vaccines brought about the eradication of smallpox and the decline of polio cases, there are some parents who still refuse to get their children vaccinated (“Vaccines and Vaccinations” 1). Those opponents of vaccination for children claim that vaccines cause harmful side effects; however, vaccines save countless of lives and, therefore, should be required by law for all U.S. …show more content…
If a population of non-immunized people are present, the population loses the herd immunity and more individuals will fall sick. Falling sick is a huge nuisance to an individual’s health and is detrimental to their finances. CDC reports that 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population gets sick from the influenza virus, resulting in two hundred hospitalizations and thirty-six thousand dollars (“Vaccines and Vaccinations” 2). Vaccination would have been able to prevent costly hospitalizations and numerous absences from work, if only those patients had decided to be immunized. it has also been proved that vaccines do not or rarely cause any harmful side effects. Therefore, there is no need to be perturbed about such a phenomenal advance in medicine. Skeptics of vaccination stand on no grounds for arguing about dangers of vaccine. The benefits clearly offsets those flawed accusations. Parents should utilize vaccinations to their advantage. This way, their children and the future generations will be kept from health and economic

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