Adventurous Life In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird

1186 Words 5 Pages
Everyone wants to believe that they live an adventurous life, that they take risks and that the decisions they make truly matters but are their lives truly adventurous? The characters lives in To Kill a Mocking Bird are filled with adventure since the moment the story begins, they end up experiencing new locations, exploring the vast unknown due to their courageous genes and creating entertainment to make the less adventurous days far more interesting. Scout and Jem Finch 's lives most certainly revolve around the two experiencing new locations. The two seem to always be going places around their main town Maycomb. As scout states on the first day of school "I never looked forward more to anything in my life" Scout Proclaimed. This shows …show more content…
This was her first year teaching in Maycomb, She was not used to the way the people lived so she was not aware how to talk or really behave when certain events came up. Instead, when events came up such as when she offered Walter Cunningham money to go buy lunch and he politely declined, she did not get the full reasoning behind why he would not accept her money. She was unaware that the Cunningham 's will not take anything they cannot pay back and he certainly knows he would not be able to return the money. Miss Caroline is unaware that him as well as his family is like this. If she would have grown up in the town, she would have known and would never have offered him the money. Furthermore, she also did not know how to behave, due to the fact that she went on this great adventure and became a teacher in a town she knew nothing about, when she walked into the classroom after lunch to see that Burris Ewell had a cootie. If she would have been Maycomb born she would have understood the effects that Burris only goes to school on the first day, not anymore after that. It did not seem …show more content…
It has been agreed upon by every single person who reads the store that in the story the children are growing up, of course since the story does not take place all in one day, but that was argued just because the children are learning, especially during the whole Tom Robinson court case, but just because the two kids are learning does not mean they are growing up. Really, the definition of growing up, according to Merriam-Webster, is to grow toward or arrive at full stature or physical or mental maturity. Scout and Jem have certainly gotten older throughout the first part of the book, but that does not mean they have gotten more mature. Their maturity level can be seen in chapter 4 when, Scout, Jem and Dill are now playing the game Boo Radley. They are all one character from the legend of Boo. Now they are smart enough to play without getting caught from Atticus. The game was highly immature. The boys, and Scout, do not even know the real story behind Boo, which explains to Scout by Miss Maudie while the boys start to exclude her out more. Furthermore, towards the end of Chapter four, Scout demands to know what the boys are planning and so they end up telling her. It turns out that the boys want to leave a note for Boo saying they wish he would come outside and tell them what he does in his house all the time and they will buy him ice cream. The immaturity level now is

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