Advantages Of Virtual Water

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The reality that the world faces a water scarcity issue is acknowledged and accepted globally, despite only a small proportion of the population directly feeling the stress of declining water availability. Virtual Water, as discussed by J.A. Allan (2003), refers to the idea that when goods and services are exchanged, so is virtual water. When a country imports 1 kilogram of rice instead of producing it domestically, it is saving around 2,300 cubic metres of real, indigenous water. If this country is water scarce, the water that is saved can be used for other purposes. If the exporting country is water scarce, however, it has thus lost 2,300 cubic metres of water since the visible water used to grow the rice is no longer available to be used …show more content…
Renault (2003) notes that one can try to surmount episodes of water shortage by forming artificial water reservoirs, but as an alternative one can also store water in its virtual form, for example by food storage. This can be a more resourceful and environmentally sustainable way to conserve and maintain water supplies than building large dams for temporary water storage. Further advantages of the virtual water concept include that in terms of practicality, the transfer of water in its virtual form is a lot less costly economically, as well as being less difficult and intrusive to physically orchestrate. Virtual water transfers in the form of commodity trade is economically feasible, (Hoekstra, 2003), particularly in a domain of relatively cheap food prices, and this trade can be assembled and organised …show more content…
It raises the question as to whether such a doubtful ‘solution’ should be implemented on an influentially huge scale when it directly controls the most important resource on earth. Theoretically, the virtual water strategy is a vital solution for water resource problems and so I agree with the ideas of Allan and Hoekstra. If exercised and applied in a just and correct manner, the virtual water strategy does indeed offer a viable solution to water scarcity. This is if the existing political, economic and social barriers that counteract its potential are overcome

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