Abiotic Geological Sequestration

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Abiotic geological sequestration takes on a similar method to storing carbon dioxide in formations. It consists of the liquefaction, transportation, and insertion of carbon dioxide into geologic layers. There are essentially four different geologic formations in which carbon dioxide can be injected into, old oil wells, coal seams, inert rock layers, and saline aquifers. The saline aquifers are positioned beneath reservoirs of freshwater with a water-resistant layer in between. Subsequently, carbon dioxide can then be injected into the aquifer to be sequestered by the brackish water. The carbon dioxide that is pumped into the saline aquifer is in such a state that the liquid it is being injected into has a higher density and viscosity. Additionally, …show more content…
Especially, the terrestrial sink because the impact on the environment is entirely positive. The three key mechanisms of the terrestrial sink are soils, forests, and wetlands. First, the afforestation of temperate and tropical regions may only make a minimal impact on the total carbon budget, but it is one of the most cost-effective ways to mitigate, although there is the downside of losing water and stream flow in some cases. Meaning that if this strategy were to be implemented the reforestation would need to be carefully assessed in order to maintain natural water systems. Similarly, the devastation to wetlands for the purpose of agriculture has become an increasing problem for biodiversity and loss of carbon dioxide storage, as well as, many other benefits that are associated with expansive wetlands. The renewal of wetlands can offset the process and revitalize wetlands to once again a source of carbon sequestration. The obstacle that makes this option look less attractive is the restoration process and the interval it takes to become as effective as a natural wetland. Lastly, the soil carbon sequestration, which involves the improving the concentration of soil through land-use conservation and implementation of management techniques in order to sustain agricultural, rural, and forest land. Reviving depleted …show more content…
Abiotic processes are expensive and complex requiring assessment of their effects on the environment. Additionally, the engineering technology is its early developmental stages, but as the mechanisms for capturing and storing carbon grow be more efficient its utilization will become prominent. This is due to the fact that abiotic processes have a larger capacity for storing carbon compared to enhanced biotic systems. Whereas, abiotic methods can contain more carbon, biotic methods are more cost-effective and are readily available today. Taken into account the daunting task of lowering the atmospheric carbon to a stabilized quantity, both processes plus other techniques like renewable energies will be needed to ease the ascending

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