Advantages Of Problem Oriented Policing

800 Words 4 Pages
There are numerous types of police, whom focus on many different types of problems, such as, illegal drugs, traffic violations, armed robbers, and many other illegal activities. What makes them all the same is that they all are trying to stop an action/s that has been deemed criminal by the governing body. “Under the system of government in the United States, only states have the right to make laws based on their police power. The lawmaking power of the federal government is limited to the specific grants of power found in the Constitution (Police Power, N.D.)”. Their power is given to them though the governing body, with limitations to that power in the form of laws. Those are same laws they are trying to enforce. Hence, no officer is above …show more content…
This type of policing could be highly effective in densely populated areas, where the local populous is the greatest tool for the gathering and relying of illegal activity. A rural police department on the other hand, does not have a large populous to utilizes in its attempts to stop and prevent crime. So, they might be more likely to use problem oriented policing. “However, there are also distinct advantages in working in a smaller, rural department. With fewer calls for service officers have time to act on crime prevention and more thoroughly investigate the crimes that do occur. Though officers probably respond to more than their fair share of barking dog and civil complaints, these contacts allow them to hone interpersonal skills and develop relationships that may prove useful in the future” (Eldridge, 2012). They also have to use different procedures when dealing with suspects. Both urban and rural police can call for additional units if necessary, but the response time for the two can be drastically different. In most cases, an urban police officer has the luxury of having another officer just a few blocks away. A rural police officer’s back up could be many minutes away and so the procedures for the two are often …show more content…
Those that manage the police have to be aware of the politics that go along with it, or face being made obsolete. Police Chiefs, Sheriffs, and other police managers are constantly being watched and examined by the public and governing body. This does have an influence on styles of policing whether we like it or not. While a police Chief and Sheriff have a lot of similarities in their job, the way they get to their position is somewhat different, and can have a major effect on what they make priorities. A police Chief is appointed by a governing body, such as a mayor. A Sheriff on the other hand, is voted in by the county residents. “City officials who have the ultimate say in what each department does. And they have this say with chiefs in the form of threat of termination/replacement should the chief come out against the city’s political leanings. Can you see the puppet strings? And while city government officials are elected, they hold their office based upon a wide variety of subjects (a platform) important to the voters, not just the single notion of laws and safety from the criminal element” (Huntington, 2013). Based off this, you can see that a police Chief may make whatever the Mayor is concerned about a top priority, while a Sheriff is more likely to care about what voters are concerned

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