Disadvantages Of Bilingualism In Children

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Defining Bilingualism: Baker (2011) has defined bilingualism is about being able to speak two languages. It is just an ability of a person to speak in two languages and not about competency in either. A bilingual person’s competency may be limited to one language which is his or her dominant language or the person may be competent in both the languages. Grosjean (2010) as quoted by Baker (2011) proposes that bilingualism is not just the knowledge it is rather speaking two languages regularly. A bilingual person may not be fluent in both the languages. In Singapore context bilingualism does not exactly mean learning or knowing any two languages. It is specifically learning English and one other language which is the home language. This would …show more content…
Leikin & Tovli (2014) mention that in their view preschoolers who have an equal command of two languages will score better in tests and generally are more creative as compared to children who speak only one language. (Kessler & Quinn, 1987; Ricciardelli, 1992; Simonton, 2008; Torrance, 1974) They are capable of understanding concepts better (Bialystok, 2005). However, this idea needs to be studied further. In this regard, Simonton’s (2008) states that there are not enough studies to prove that bilingualism has an effect of creativity. Since 1992, a few studies have tried to look into the relationship between the two. (Adesope et al., 2010, Hommel, Colzato, Fischer, & Christoffels, 2011; Kharkurin, 2010b; M. Leikin, 2013). Even in those studies if it is mentioned that bilingual children are creative simply refers to creativity in terms of language. In other areas of learning they may not be creative enough. (Kharkhurin, 2010a, Lasagabaster, 2000; Simonton, …show more content…
Data in the form of small-scale surveys of such families was gathered. The paterns of language usage among family members whether it is between parents, parents and their children, and language spoken among siblings, was analysed. This research identified problems faced by such families in teaching two languages to their children. Yamamato (1995) concludes that even if all the children in the family have an equal knowledge and competence in two languages, they may still choose one language. In such cases children usually choose a language spoken by them which is same as their monolingual friends at school. They will prefer to use the language spoken by the society around them so that they can be part of their

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