Institutional Racism In Schools

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Institutional racism is defined as racism that is ingrained into the procedures and practices of schools that cause disadvantage and discrimination for ethnic minority groups. There is evidence that there is differential achievement in terms of ethnicity. This is evidenced by 79% of Chinese students achieving 5A*-C GCSE grades (including English and Maths) and 74% of Indian students achieving 5A*-C GCSE grades (including English and Maths). This compares significantly to 60% of Bangladeshi pupils achieving 5A*-C GCSE grades (including English and Maths) and 58% of white British students achieving 5A*-C GCSE grades (including English and Maths). This compares even more significantly to only 53% of Pakistani students achieve 5A*-C GCSE grades …show more content…
This is evidenced by the processes and practices of the school for example, teacher labelling. Gillborn and Youdell found that teachers often had racist assumptions which led them to believe that Afro-Caribbean boys were troublesome and disruptive and they found the behaviour of these students as challenging. This often led to teachers negatively stereotyping and labelling these boys and then placing the Afro-Caribbean boys into lower tier GCSE papers which limits their ability to achieve the top grades. This led to a self-fulfilling prophecy amongst the boys as they felt they were not capable of achieving the top grades. Wright would further support the view that teacher labelling exists because he found that teachers held negative labels of Pakistani and Bangladeshi students. Teachers believe that Pakistani and Bangladeshi students have a poor grasp of English and this led to teachers leaving these pupils out of class discussions or only speaking to them in simple terms. This shows that schools are institutionally racist because teachers label certain ethnic groups negatively and this has a knock-on effect on educational achievement. However, this view can be criticised because Mirza claims that black Afro-Caribbean girls are also negatively labelled by their teachers, regardless of these negative labels, black Afro-Caribbean girls often work hard in education …show more content…
This is evidenced by conflicting cultural values between the family and the education system. According to Hendessi, research evidence suggests that poverty is one of the key factors leading to educational underachievement in young Pakistani pupils, in particular Pakistani girls. Pakistani and Bangladeshi families are amongst the poorest in Britain. In addition to poverty, family and cultural norms and values are key to the underachievement of Pakistani girls. For many Pakistani and Bangladeshi families, their values conflict with the values of education as they advocate early marriage and early motherhood. A woman’s role is to be a good wife and mother, therefore, formal education is unnecessary. This is evidenced by 73% of Bangladeshi women and 60% of Pakistani women have no formal qualifications. This means that parents place little value on education and are unlikely to encourage regular attendance at school. Household chores come first and school comes second which reinforces the traditional gender division. Poorly educated parents are unlikely to motivate their children in education and poor parents are unlikely to have the time and money to support their children with schoolwork or to help them resolve difficulties at school. In addition to this, there are crises in terms of domestic violence to their mothers which makes the

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