Advantages And Disadvantages Of Irrigation

1334 Words 6 Pages
When it comes to gardens, plants need to have enough sunlight, quality soil, and clean water. Most people plant with the right amount of sun and good soil, however, many people don’t consider the pureness of the water flowing through their irrigation system. Irrigation is a system used to supply a plant with water so that the plant may flourish in amount and quality. The purpose of irrigation is to bring water to croplands that normally do not receive enough water from rain or from underground water shelves. The process can come with different conflicts, for instance, debris reaching your plants. When it comes to irrigation systems it is debated that a water filter is not needed. A water filter is used to keep the nozzle unhindered, free of …show more content…
Filters are designed to keep irrigation systems free from debris and other particles that can clog the sprinkler head. Without a filter there could be a negative effect on the system 's overall performance; for instance, it could leave dry plants, dead plants, and bad tasting food & fruits. Small particles of sand can enter a system and cause wear and tear, however, sand isn’t the only thing that can enter small water passageways and clog them. Filters are responsible for taking out solid substances, weird odors and tastes, and other particles bad for the health. Algae can grow inside the system and malfunctions would start to occur. The newer model filters are more water effective; they save water, prevent wasted water, and prevent floods. When a filter isn’t there the water can be contaminated, then it settles in the plants, and the person who eats the plant may ingest the contamination. Without a filter, everything dealing with plants that a person would want clean and pure, wouldn 't be clean or …show more content…
In the first test, the water came out black but did not clog the nozzle. The next test consisted of the same amount of materials, but in the order of cheesecloth, sand, charcoal, and then gravel. During the second test when the faucet water went through the filter, it came out a little black, not like the first test and didn’t clog the nozzle. The third pilot had the same order as the second, but this time, we used a full medium paper cup of ammonia and 100 ml of yellow food coloring. The ammonia went through as an orange punch color and came out as dark orange and nozzle not clogged, and we noticed it actually got darker. Next, a ¼ cup of ammonia, ¼ cup of vegetable oil, and a cup of water was mixed together and poured down the pipe. The fourth experimental resulted in the ammonia, vegetable oil, and water not going through the nozzle. We then figured out that oil doesn’t go through. In the last trial, water with 100 ml of orange food coloring went in orange and came out very light yellow like urine. The nozzle was not clogged. When testing the hypothesis of designing a filter with specific materials will result in clean water, my partner and I came to the conclusion that the filter both succeeded and failed. Ammonia along with vegetable oil were two failures. The ammonia came out with the same strong smell it started with, and the oil

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