Advantages And Disadvantages Of Homeschool

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Register to read the introduction… The curriculum may include fieldtrips, outdoor activities and other “experiential elements” without losing the essence of learning; parents can prepare various activities related to all current subjects including math (Miser 98). Though academic institutions offer fieldtrips, such activities are scarce. Schools rarely incorporate field involvement and outdoor activities to their curriculum because of insufficient time. Thus, learning stays in classroom. Sometimes, there is hardly any learning because students’ interest and attention are almost non-existent during heavy lectures. On the other hand, homeschooled students can engage in enjoyable activities and complete homeworks simultaneously. Moreover, different homeschoolers can collaborate to plan trips so that homeschooled students can meet and interact with each other (62). This fact disproves most people’s belief; homeschool do provide sufficient social interaction. Instead of a school-based or classroom-based, students participate in a community-based socialization. Their social skills may even exceed those of institutional students due to socializing in a more diverse area. Homeschool expands students’ social involvement and learning …show more content…
Unless they hired a private tutor, students’ knowledge enhancement depends heavily on one parent. Therefore, parents’ abilities and qualification greatly matter. Some claim that “untrained parents” are incapable of providing “comprehensive education” (“Homeschool”). Furthermore, extensive preparation and commitment are thoroughly needed. If the teaching parent is not eager or prepared, then it might actually sabotage the child’s education. However, providing such commitment is rather difficult because parents teach their child at the expense of their own time and sometimes even their own jobs (Miser 23). Thus, homeschool is less suited for single parents. These cases justify Christopher Lubienski’s claim that homeschooling “is not an option available to all” (Cox). But the most recurring argument about homeschool is the limited social involvement with peers which both public and private schools provide. These barriers indeed hinder rather than promote educational growth. Nonetheless, deciding whether homeschool is a benefit or a detriment depends on the concern of the parents or the child. In most cases, the concern lies on “academic performance” and overall character development …show more content…
. . such as public education” (Cox). This notion has at least two flaws. First, it is imperative for two distinct means with a common end to avoid competition. For example, the rivalry of large companies or the rivalry of public and private schools is a typical occurrence in our society. Secondly, homeschool is not meant to replace compulsory education. Unlike business firms whose aim is victory over others and fame for themselves, all learning institutions pursue educational progress. The goal is not for their benefit but for the student’s; thus, no system of education was established to eliminate others. homeschool offers choices and possibilities that both private and public schools have limited access to. In fact, transition between school-based and home-based education may even provide desirable results because both former and latter have what the other

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