Adaptation Of King Loar In William Shakespeare's King Lear

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King Lear is one of William Shakespeare’s most famous works and highly regarded as quite possibly his greatest play written if not one of the most tragic he's written. The original story that Shakespeare based his play off of is derived from the legend of Lair of Britain and is not nearly as tragic as the King Lear adaptation. The play depicts the main character King Lear and his decent into madness as he gives his kingdom away to his daughters. In comparison to her sisters, Cordelia, the youngest of Lear's three daughters comes off to readers as almost saint like due to her being one of the only characters in the play who is actually genuinely principled and centered. Cordelia appears in the play a total of four times out of the twenty-six …show more content…
She is basically absent throughout the bulk of the action that takes place, and yet after finishing the book, you can’t help but feel that she has actually been an ever-present force the entire time; a sort of pervading influence has been radiated out from within her and directed towards the good in their labors of love as well as restraining the evil forces and their powers. Cordelia is pictured as a sweet, tender, picture perfect lady of the standard of womanhood who is pure of the frivolous things and ideas as well as disgusting manners. Is there any wonder this is the image that calls to mind when thinking about Lear's doting love, of France’s manly affection for her, of Kent's dignified respect towards her, and moreover of the Fool's pining attachment of her? Cordelia is nothing more than the embodiment of a male fantasy. We see that at the very beginning of the play, Cordelia refuses to give into Lear’s demands of a confession of love and asserts her own identity which her sisters do not even attempt to do. She straight up refuses to give him all of her love like he wants and instead she decides to reserve some of that love it for her future husband. By the end, Cordelia’s independence that we see has now disappeared and Lear finally has what he wants which is all of his daughter’s love, despite the end it seems that they will meet. “We are not the first who, with best meaning, have …show more content…
But Cordelia’s answer is not necessarily wrong. Love is not just something that can be bought or in this case given in the form of land; it is the one of the only thing that can never hurt us and that we find solace in, but as we can see it may also end up having drastic consequences. To put it simply, love is a bond that is much easier to feel rather than explain to someone. In the case of Cordelia, there seems to be no question as to if she truly does love her father, which can be plain to see when we compare her statement is compared to that of her two sisters. What King Lear is trying to do when he asks his daughters to profess their love for him is he is trying to buy their love and affection. Although it is possible that General and Regan may actually have love in their hearts for their father, they do not love their father in the way Cordelia really does, and it’s because of her lack of being able to put love into words that she is punished. Both General and Regan told their father exactly what it was that he wanted to hear. This self-righteous pride of the characters, though later they come to thankfully regret it, is what ultimately triggers the catastrophe of the entire

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