Acculturation Gap In Counselling

767 Words 4 Pages
Besides, intergenerational conflicts may be bound to happen for most immigrants based on the acculturation gap between parents and children, as children of immigrants tend to adapt easily into the culture they find themselves. Furthermore, Smokowski & Bacallao (2007) indicate conflict between parents and adolescents may increase the acculturation stress by creating intergenerational and intercultural problems. Children often become involved in the United States culture faster then the adults, which instigates the development of an acculturation gap. The study also indicated that teens who are in conflict with their parents are more likely to internalize problems therefore increasing their acculturation stress, which is related to depression …show more content…
116) between their traditional culture at home, and the conflicting values they are experiencing in their social life. Likewise, in counselling the parent the use of ethnographic inquiry, could be very effective in supporting an immigrant client, especially if it appears treatment may “shut down as soon as it begins” (Seeley, 2004, p. 128) due to cultural resistances to treatment. As seeking counselling can be viewed as a blow to dignity and values (Rana & Sihota, 2013), counsellors may be wise to prepare for culturally-based resistance and be open to exploring it (Seeley, 2004). In conducting an ethnographic inquiry of the family’s cultural resistance, the counsellor could ask the family to describe cultural norms regarding seeking help. The counsellor could ask each member of the family to tell a story about seeking help back in their own country. The counsellor could also explore any perceived stigma associated with seeking counselling. It’s also possible that by working through the family’s resistances, they may choose to continue with counselling after …show more content…
This employment problems can affect their physical or mental health, as they can feel sad, angry, frustration, feelings of rejection, and even useless, and this in return can affect their health. As an immigrant myself, I have been and seen situation like where immigrants take low paying jobs or low skills job with higher education, racial discrimination, stereotype about traits, verbal abuse and sometimes it could also be personal challenges (lack of confidences, no Canadian experience, lack of self-awareness, and lack of education).In working with this clientele a counsellor can only understand what a person has gone through by exploring it together. Open communication is a central strategy to employ in the quest to avoid stereotypes. Sheely-Moore & Kooyman (2011) discuss the skill of broaching, openly discussing issues related to culture, race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation and so on, as they relate to the unique individual. I appreciate how developing this questioning skill supports the commitment to maintain a multicultural lens with each client, however, I am reminded of the recommendation that counsellors consider the value of each question. Another, way to avoid a lack of trust between a client and counsellor is to ensure that verbal and non-verbal messages are congruent, accurate and appropriate which will build the level of trust (France, Rodriguez & Hett,

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