Abraham Lincoln A Hero

Improved Essays
On a rural hill, about one hundred miles west of Lexington and sixty miles south of Louisville, a baby was born at daybreak to a struggling Kentucky family. In only a few years after that cold February morning, the state that this child first called home raised and sent troops south to participate in a conflict nationalistically proclaimed as the "Second War for Independence.” The war with British troops and hostile natives that began in 1812 laid the groundwork for a new generation of Americans and served as an epochal launch for the young country. To measure the significance of this outcome one can assess the political careers that were cast for its heroes and, more consequently, the power structure of spoils men, landed …show more content…
However, if you go looking for a hero in Lincoln, you are likely to find one. He did not possess slaves like Washington, Jefferson, Madison, or Taylor. He did not directly evict a large number of indigenous people from their ancestral homelands as did Jackson, nor did he concoct a war with Mexico to seize, or at least secure, nearly a third of the United States like Polk. He was not born to wealth like the Roosevelts, the Kennedys, or Bushes and had no known marital infidelities like FDR, Eisenhower, or JFK. Instead, he was a surveyor of freedom and justice, a man of humblest beginnings, and a wielder of moral authority. This should not go without saying that he waged a domestic war against the southern population, disregarded the English speaking world 's most sacred precept from Magna Charta with his temporary suspension of Habeas Corpus, and he violated constitutional principles when he threatened to imprison a Supreme Court Chief Justice. While this is certainly not a complete list of shortcomings, even these notable blemishes are often excused as unavoidable or necessary abuses to America 's short …show more content…
Trans-Appalachian life in 1809 was tough, short, unsettled, and did not afford the developing opportunities enjoyed by the coastal residents of the original thirteen states. Vermont and Kentucky, added in 1791 and 1792, were states for less than twenty years at Abraham 's birth. In these decades of America 's national infancy, European issues, native uprisings, and constitutional questions dominated geographical, economic, and political development. However, in the aftermath of the War of 1812, the Era of Good Feelings did much to relieve some of the major doubts and the threats that lingered during America 's shaky start. During this time, John Quincy Adams authored the toothless, yet highly symbolic, Monroe Doctrine that warned against any new European intrusions. The geopolitical workings made by the Secretary of State (and one of America 's last direct connections to the American Revolution) offered the country a more relaxed path toward natural and independent development. This augmentation would accelerate with the growth of limited manufacturing in the north, cotton plantations in the south, and homestead agriculture in the west. The market and transportation revolutions, along with a rapidly growing population, acted as catalysts for sectional defined existences within a burgeoning national

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The leaders of the south wanted to keep slavery and they went to war over it. Also, Livingston may have reversed “myth” to far by saying that the South was less egregious towards Blacks than the North. With men like Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens who said, “slavery—subordination to the superior race—is his natural and moral condition” (72) gives foundation for the great depravity in the slaveholder’s mind. What seems to be clear, is that slavery and prejudice was not a North or South issue; rather it is what it has always been—a humanity issue. Livingston is correct.…

    • 1063 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Therefore, they advocated that the state itself should fund the project. Despite efforts against federally funded internal improvement projects, the inevitable happened: Clay’s dream of a transportation network came true. In 1816, Congress ordered construction of a federally funded national road to link the Chesapeake with the Trans-Appalachian West. Soon, the boom in canal and road construction led to a transportation revolution, which drove the costs of moving people and goods down even…

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Articles of Confederation was made with the intention to have a weak central government. Reason being is that America had just broke free of an oppressive ruler so they weren’t looking for someone to boss them around. Therefore instead of the power given to the central/national government, like Britain, they let the power reside within the states, or better known as the Thirteen colonies. However as a result they national government couldn’t regulate commerce, and this loophole left the states free to establish different and often conflicting laws. Nor could they raise a national army because of the previous wounds king George III had left, and worst of all levy taxes.…

    • 1848 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After the Civil War economic expansion grew with new innovation accelerated farming and industrialization. Foreign resources, a steady government, capitalism, and ample cheap workers would add to the economic expansion of the United States. Development would also prompt social worsening overproduction in the 1890s, this would lead to unemployment and calls to rebuild the American financial framework. A thriving population and immigration would force American and Canadian pioneers to press into the western boundaries through railroad…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What Is Kennedy's Claim?

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages

    He leaves the connection between population advantage and Northern victory mostly implicit. Kennedy does not explain how a larger railway system aids the North in its victory over the confederacy. He does connect manufacturing with ships and weapons explicitly. He does make convincing arguments for his claims but there is no real evidence. He does not use any data or 3rd party sources.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the time period, the only way Americans could get land was from conquest, and territorializing. Evidently, U.S Imperialism was incredibly important to the development of America. However, as previously stated before Manifest Destiny was all based on blind faith, and the belief that America was destined to grow, and develop. I agree with the fact that America needed to expand, and pursue alternative methods of capital, and I come to the conclusion that Manifest Destiny gave them the approval in expanding. In simpler terms, America knew that it had to expand, and the theory of Manifest Destiny basically gave them an excuse to expand in the name of divine intervention.…

    • 1037 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    James Madison was the president at the time and was not very involved in this war. Alos, there were no great war generals in this war, and the causes of this war were very complex and misunderstood. “As America's second and last war against Great Britain, it echoed the ideology and issues of the American Revolution. It was the second and last time that America was the underdog in a war and the second and last time that the nation tried to conquer Canada” (An American Perspective on the War of 1812). This quote from pbs.org shows just how much obscure this war was.…

    • 1705 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    So, George goes to the north, but he promises to return to his family. The Civil War is very beneficial to this family. Master Murray hires an overseer during this time named George Johnson. After the war is over, the free Murray family arrives in Lauderdale County, Tennessee. Many years pass, and Tom starts a new blacksmith business from his wagon.…

    • 1344 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When South Carolina nullified the federal tariff and threatened to secede the union by force, Jackson was forced use military in an attempt to preserve the union and its liberties, “Fellow citizens, the momentous case is before you. On your undivided support of your government depends the decision of the great question it involves-whether your sacred union will be preserved and the blessing it secures to us as one people shall be perpetuated.” (Nullification Proclamation). Jackson’s defiant nationalism in his proclamation later served as a precedent to Abraham Lincoln in 1861. Andrew Jackson’s Indian Removal Act of 1830 is often cited as one of his most horrific acts as president. However, it wasn’t his intention to harm them nor was he the only President who believed removal was the only policy to protect Indians from annihilation.…

    • 869 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since Lincoln issued the EP as a military measure, it didn 't apply to border slave states like Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, all of which had remained loyal to the Union (History.com).” This proves that Abraham Lincoln only saved a few slaves, and that he only passed the Emancipation Proclamation as a military measure, not because it was right. However, you may argue that Abraham Lincoln made the Emancipation Proclamation. This may be true, but the Emancipation Proclamation was only for military ambitions and not to help free the slaves. Lincoln only helped discharge a few slaves, but he didn’t save most of them. To sum up, Abraham Lincoln claimed he was against slavery; however, most evidence shows that he benefited slavery.…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays