Abraham Kuyper And Ideas Of Karl Marx And Friedrich Engels

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During the Industrial Revolution there major problems were stirring in European society. These problems mostly involved the rankings in society between the middle class and the poor workers. These problems extended to the Netherlands on how the rich looked down at the poor. The ideas of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, the authors of the Communist Manifesto, were exceptionally different from the ideas of Abraham Kuyper as seen in their religion or absence thereof, the audience to which they were speaking, as well as the time and setting in which they wrote their books. Marx and Kuyper both identified a noteworthy problem within the society they were living and tried to come up with a solution for it. Their ideas may have been quite different, …show more content…
The way in which people view the world can strongly influence the way in which they interpret and deal with the problems posed to them. As a result, it is imperative that time is taken to really know the two different authors. The most important difference to note about Marx and Kuyper is their religions. Karl Marx was an atheist, his religion was found in his ideas rather than God. On the other hand, Kuyper was a minister of Christianity. We will see the way in which their religions play an astronomical role in the differences of each of their ideas. We also must not to whom they were addressing when they wrote their books. Kuyper wrote The Problem of Poverty to the people in the Netherlands, while Marx wrote to Europe as a whole. Although these two men had their differences, they both had a strong passion for what they truly believed. As a result they both were very influential men in …show more content…
These differences affect how they perceived the world and how they differently viewed the problems posed to them. Kuyper viewed The Problem of Poverty through the lenses of Scripture, while Marx took an entirely different approach as an atheist, still addressing a similar problem. It is important to note the different solutions they posed as well as how they believed to carry them out in their daily life. It is amazing to compare and contrast the ideas of two brilliant men and digest their opposing views on how to deal with the problems in society. After engaging in this material, a Christian is more capable of interacting with the material of the world from an educated Christian perspective and is able to give a more convincing argument because of they have seen and understood both sides of the

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