Abortion And The Great Depression Essay

The effects of the Great Depression intensified the debate on abortion in the United States. Prior to 1867, abortion was legal in the United States. The legalization of abortion occurred in mid-eighteen century. However, abortion became illegal between 1867 and 1973. The Great Depression touched on every aspect of women’s lives. This period was characterized by high incidences of abortion. The number of jobs reduced, people lost their homes and funds became scanty. Due to lack of support for children, married couples took their children to orphanages. Pregnant women performed abortion to reduce the number of children. This period led to the sacking of women in various occupations (Dayton, 7). There was contention that jobs belonged to men and …show more content…
This period was marked by job cuts, weak economy, declining financial systems, job uncertainties as well as discrimination of women at workplaces. Abortion cases rose significantly. Women became very uncertain of the prevailing economic moments. Women who had children did not want to bear more children for lack of fear of means to sustain them. Single women delayed their marriage plans due to the uncertain times that had characterized this period. There was little money left to support children and large families. In some cases, families took their children to orphanages due to their inability to provide care for them (Robbin, 4). The rates of marriages dropped significantly. During this period, women were discriminated in the workplaces as men held on to available jobs to enable them to feed their families. Women who got pregnant in the course of work lost their jobs. Abortion cases soared during this time. Most women were not able to acquire insurance for their …show more content…
The study reveals that abortion was legal in the period of mid-eighteen century in the United States. This period fell before 1880’s. Women carried out abortion at will without any legal restrictions. However, the various states in the United States criminalized abortion after 1880. The criminalization of abortion during this period led to a significant increase in illegal abortions. Many women resorted to backstreet abortions through midwives. The consequences of this practice led to increased cases of complications among pregnant women. Criminalization of abortion went on until the Great Depression. During this period, women were discriminated upon by their male counterparts in the workplaces. Due to reduced number of jobs and economic instability, abortion soared during this period despite the ban. However, the decision by the Supreme Court to overturn the ban on abortion by various states in 1973 offered women a breakthrough. The ruling observed that women’s decision to terminate pregnancy at the first trimester was a right contained in the constitution. In light of the foregoing, it is indubitable that the experience of women in the United States is a story of

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