Aboriginal And Strait Islander People Case Study

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are today acknowledged as the owners and custodians of this land we call home, but unfortunately, they have experienced situations that have completely disregarded their basic human rights before they received their rightful title. This essay will look at the history/ background of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in regards to their rights within Australia, analyse certain ethical issues that have occurred when dealing with their rights, outline the legislation and policies that form the basis for their rights and discuss current issues that Indigenous people face today referring to their rights and the justice system.
The first settlement was in 1788; Governor Phillip was in charge
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These policies cover a variety of services such as health, education and human rights. They have had a major impact on their lives as they have been able to receive medical attention, an education, legal support and access to justice which has been needed due to the high rates of incarceration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. These policies have had an extremely strong effect on the Indigenous people. Unfortunately, the Indigenous people had the policies of segregation, protection and assimilation pushed upon them before receiving the rights and policies that they and every human being deserve. These policies of segregation, protection and assimilation have had an incredibly negative effect on the Indigenous population. The policies were forced on them by the British settlers in the 1800’s-1900’s (Australian Museum, 2009). The policy of assimilation caused the Indigenous population the most heartache and trauma. In the 1920’s, “half-castes” were being removed from their Indigenous mothers and families and were pushed into society to try and reduce the amount of people living in the reserves so that the land could be sold to white farmers. This created the Stolen Generation, which consisted of so many actions that completely disregarded the rights of the Indigenous population (Lang, & Catzikiris, …show more content…
These situations commenced shortly after the settlement of the British including, being kicked off their land, being forced into reserves or missions, having to go through the Stolen Generation period because of policies such as segregation protection and assimilation which were made up by the Protection Board who were supposed to be put in place to protect them. These issues have lead onto other issues that are still current within today’s society such as the over-representation of the Indigenous population who come in contact with the justice system despite new legislation and policies that have been put in place to help the Indigenous population such as the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 and Racial Discrimination Act

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