Abolitionist Movement And The Feminist Movement

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A player in both abolitionist movements and the feminist movement was Englishwoman Francis Wright. She used the utopian ideas of Charles Fourier and Mary Wollstonecraft’s equality thoughts towards anti-slavery. “Wright published A Plan for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery in the United States without Danger of Loss to the Citizens of the South, a pamphlet in which she proposed that the U.S government create Owenite slave plantations where profits would go to the purchase of the slaves’ freedom” which proves how one group’s fight for equality helped create ideas and plans for another. She even went to establish a community like this in Memphis, Tennessee called Nashoba. Sadly it never prospered and she returned to England. She went on to do …show more content…
They were subjected and were going to be subjected to inhumane laws that barred them from full participation in the community. The major beginning of their fight began in 1848, the year of revolutions across Europe, which called for the liberation of the middle class among other rights. The poor harvests combined with disease caused uproar and when the people noticed only some of them got a say, or vote, in the matter they looked for expanded suffrage. The liberal Jews participated in this fight in the hopes it would grant them equality civilly and politically with the rest of the groups fighting. Some Jews fought side by side with non-Jews but mostly it brought more hostility towards them. There was a large fear that the Jewish community, if they gained equality, would come to dominate the country. The Jews were associated with the bourgeoisie class that supposedly wanted to bring more capitalistic production to society, which would harm farmers and artisans. This led the farmers and artisans to blame the Jews for their economic …show more content…
The fight for equality was fought on almost every level. The various insurrections and intellectual development created the perfect home for minorities to stand up and fight for themselves. Each group influenced the other and some even participated and supported various groups. The women helped in the struggle to abolish slavery and in doing this they opened their eyes to how badly they were viewed and treated leading them to begin their own campaign. The support and the examples set by one another allowed the fight for equality to be fostered around the globe. The fight for equality is not completely over for any of the aforementioned groups. Women are still seen as fragile, inferior, emotional creatures that are not capable of holding high office. They are even paid less than men for the same work still, even though this was fought for decades ago. Africans or anyone with dark skin is discriminated against for their look and is seen as dangerous to society. Jews are still the subjects of ridicule for being seen as cheap or unsatisfying to look at. What the nineteenth century campaigns did was win suffrage, freedom, and a version of equality that was better than what minorities or marginalized groups were given at the time. The slave trade is over. Women have the right to vote and hold political positions. Jews are allowed to practice their profession and intermarry with non-Jews. The nineteenth century was a

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