Abolism In Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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The question of society’s views and individual morals are evident in many stories, but none is more apparent than in Mark Twain’s satiric novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This coming-of age novel centers on Huck’s journey as he discovers how to abandon the social view forced on him after being raised in a predominate white society. Still today, the novel is considered one of the most controversial and banned books taught in school. Although the theme of racism is prominent in the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn also places an emphasis on the subject of thinking for oneself. Through religious hypocrisy, witnessing Jim’s humaneness, and rejection of society, Huck ultimately risks himself and being called a “low-down Abolitionist” …show more content…
The distinguished characters include Miss Watson and Widow Douglas. In the esteem of Christianity, they exhort Huck to “help other people, and do everything I (Huck) could for other people” (Twain 11), yet they have no hesitation about owning others. As Miss Watson gathers the slaves for their evening prayers, the slaves are fooled to accepting the idea that it’s the “will of God” (Kallin 10) that they are bound to their masters. Miss Watson and Widow Douglas are described as “well-intended Christians” (Kallin 10), but their beliefs had mislead them to believe slavery is reasonable. Not only is their religion deceitful, they indulge themselves in hypocrisy. Widow Douglas scolds Huck for his smoking habits, nevertheless, it’s justifiable for her to “snuff… because she done it herself.” (Twain 2) This society cloaked itself in a “veil of self-deception and where its practitioners preached hypocritical and absurd religious values.” (Kallin 8) Society preaches to others about becoming their standard “good people” (Twain 75), but they lack the self awareness of true ethics and “are living their lives according to the old morals.” (Magfirah …show more content…
During one particular scene, Jim’s daughter, Elizabeth, was ill with the scarlet fever, which left her deaf. Jim, unaware, told her to “’Shet de do’” (Twain 156) but she “jis’ stood dah, kiner smilin’ up at” (Twain 156) Jim. It then made him furious when she did not respond nor act when he tells her once again. “En wid dat I (Jim) fetch’ her a slap side de head dat sont her a-sprawlin’.” (Twain 156) Jim finally arrived to the conclusion of Elizabeth’s deafness which left her “deef en dumb.” (Twain 156) He was overcome by a unfathomable contrition and tells Huck “ I burst out a-cryin’… De Lord God Amighty forgive po’ ole Jim, kaze he never gqyne to forgive hisself as long’s he live!” (Twain 156) Thus Jim’s values is the same as a white man’s and shows emotions society deems blacks lack there of. His ability to “feel deep, human emotions, Twain demonstrates the contradictions of his culture” (Gregory) and at the same time becomes an “uncomfortable realization for Huck because it presents an intolerable ideological refutation to all that he has been taught” (Yuh

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