1984 Comparative Analysis

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Aberrant Data Allow it to be said, as a point of peremptory optimism, that the author of this essay invests every confidence in the strength of the human intelligence. Men fail, as surely and naturally as any carbonic life, but one mind always survives another. And the mind endures, ungovernable, difficulty notwithstanding. The question of utopia is not so easily answered as “perfection” or dystopia as “imperfection”. “Perfect” is not a reasonable or corporate state ; it is an apparition, flitting across each separate and respective conscious. Practicably, utopia and dystopia are mentally engendered by command of the human mind. If each brain were completely reconstituted, so that any thoughts entering therein were run like a cortical clockwork, …show more content…
The importance of their works is in their effects: the machines, though owning operative differences, are still fed a social body which, borne among hot coals and heat, are changed- dehumanized.
These very means must nevertheless be essayed. In Brave New World, Huxley suggests genetic engineering as his mode of human manufacture. The populations of the World State are concocted, the result being a completely predictable social body which, artificially conditioned from early on, and saved from the chances of viviparous reproduction, are easily brought in and mastered. Sexual and spiritual escapes, obstructions to the logical cause, are synthetically replaced. Everyone is happy.
Orwell subscribes likewise to human conditioning. In “Doublethink”, any reasonable Oceanian transacts reality, untruth upon untruth, so that “Whatever was true now was true from everlasting to everlasting. It was quite simple. All that was needed was an unending series of victories over your own memory” (Orwell 31). Orwell’s observation allowed him to believe that people could, after a measurable manipulation, accept contradiction which is most naturally refused entrance into the human mind. As for the sexual impulse, it easily becomes the armament of hatred and war, or else is only momentarily pacified through prostitution or other
…show more content…
The economic machine bent to its work, producing on an instant what any manual labor could not achieve. There was apprehension, of course; the work mills were “dark and satanic”, and the people themselves were reduced into a moral crudity (that is, from a moralistic philosophy). Bohemianism came out of the earliest need for escapism in the industrial world, something to which the doctrines of middle and latter philosophers can partly be ascribed. The Bohemians were mostly vagrant artists and the practitioners of an immaterial life. These lives were usually a contradiction of bourgeois ways of thought. Critically, it can be said that the Bohemians, much as the Transcendentalists or the Hippies, were without modernity’s commonest sensibility: the practical and necessary measures of survival. Although the fecundity of industrialist practice could not be argued, the utopian enchantment was perhaps so deeply impressed in the Bohemians’ intellectual pretensions that they could not accept the necessary progression of the scientific

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