Abar The Great: The Rise And Fall Of The Mughal Empire

1096 Words 5 Pages
Indian history has been full of conflict, and has seen the rise and fall of multiple dynasties. Within India’s complex history and running line of changing rulers, one dynasty in particular stood out amongst the rest: the Mughal Dynasty. The Mughal Dynasty, originally formed by Turkic prince, Babur, reigned India from 1527 to 1857. The grandson of Babur, Jalauddin Muhammad Akbar, soon took control of the empire at the young and feeble age of 13. From his extensive movements to better unite India, he soon coined the name ‘Akbar the Great’. “With a vision of an empire and a sense of mission that developed on the basis of uniting India under his rule, Akbar quickly became one of the most influential rulers of India” (Stearns). All of this combined …show more content…
He was able to expand his empire great distances and bring most of the people within it. together. “The young emperor was able to expand all the way to Afghanistan in the north, Sindh in the west, Bengal in the east and the Godavari River in the south” (Akbar the Great Biography). From spanning out his empire, Akbar the Great was able to earn the loyalty of his subjects and conquered people with relative ease. This was due in part from being known for rewarding talent, loyalty, and intellect. Unlike most emperors, Akbar appointed conquered people as head of government posts if they were qualified. In the Mughal empire under Akbar’s reign, jobs were given not by who you knew or who you were, but whether or not you were deserving of the post and qualified for it as …show more content…
Created by Akbar the Great, the Din-i-Ilahi was a religion that blended the various elements of which he was accustomed to. He was able to successfully take the aspects of Muslim faith and Hindu faith to create a sort of mix between the two. This religion was able to unite, albeit temporarily, most of his empire under Akbar’s reign. One of the main reasons Akbar had for creating this unique new system was to end religious disputes and to unite all people under a common code. “If the adherents of India’s diverse regions could be convinced to embrace this common creed, sectarian quarrels and even violent conflict could be brought to an end”

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