Aaron Beck's Theory Of Cognitive Behavior

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Cognition can be defined as “the mental processes of perceiving, recognizing, conceiving, judging and reasoning” (44). Thus, the meaning of classic cognitive behaviour therapy refers to the practice of integrating theory and research on conscious processes. In other words, cognitive behaviour therapy refers to the direct manipulation of an individual’s conspicuous and inconspicuous behaviour with feelings and thoughts are interpreted as internal or covert behaviours. Namely, the psychiatrist Aaron Beck (1976) created Cognitive Theory. Beck’s theory has to do with manipulating the clients thoughts and experiences. When a person is depressed, they mainly focus on the negative aspects of their life and mainly overlooking the positives. …show more content…
When it came to discussing cognitive restructuring with the client, the therapist made sure to include terms that caused cognitive distortion, such as probability overestimation (overestimation of a negative event occurring) and catastrophic thinking (exaggerating the consequences of a negative event). When Dennis understood these terms, the therapist then spent time discussing certain experiences that caused Dennis to become anxious. The therapist also helped Dennis’ catastrophic thoughts by replacing exaggerations with realistic thoughts during therapy sessions. He eventually was instructed to write in a diary when he was outside of therapy and was write down the cognitive distortions which were to be followed by a complementary self-statements that Dennis should have been thinking of instead of the distorted thoughts. Eventually, he became aware of his cognitive distortions that normally led to anxiety. Now that he was conscious of the catastrophic thoughts and probable overestimations that could cause his anxiety, the therapist was successful in cognitive …show more content…
Studies have concluded that schizophrenics were able to recognize facial affect in others, as well as working memory and attention. (CME Institute, 2007. 359). The utility of scaffolding was studied in Canada, by having instructors select tasks that reflect their client’s current capabilities so then they are eventually able to solve problems for themselves. The development of problem solving skills and processes was the goal of the study in order for their clients to generalize to new situations. Schizophrenic clients were introduced to this approach and it was evident that cognitive improvements were increased and maintained at that well after a month. The clients who participated in the scaffolding approach generally had a higher level of positive affect and self esteem which improved their self-regulation and self-conceptualization. As with many other types of therapy, there will always be criticisms of their approach and how effective they truly are no matter the conclusions of studies. Rational-emotive behaviour therapy, a type of CBT has conducted several research studies, concluding that it reduces general anxiety, speech anxiety and test anxiety and can treat excessive anger, depression and anti-social behaviour to name a few findings. However, there is a lack of comparisons with REBT and other types of approaches, making it difficult to accurately see its’

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