A Tragic Hero In William Shakespeare's The Tragedy Of Julius Caesar

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In William Shakespeare 's The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus possesses all of the traits of a tragic hero in the eyes of Aristotle. Brutus is the perfect candidate for a tragic hero, containing all of the tragic hero traits. This includes nobility, peripeteia, anagnorisis, and catharsis. Between everything Brutus does for the people of Rome, he shows anyone that he is the most noble of them all. He definitely proves himself to be an honorable man. Out of all the things that describe Brutus, noble is a good choice overall. Brutus is a highly complex character considering that he was one of the conspirators involved in the assassination of Julius Caesar. He is honorable but evil, a villain and a hero, loved and hated all at the same time. …show more content…
Once Caesar is dead, while Brutus explains the reasoning behind Caesar’s assassination, he tells the crowd, “Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I / loved Rome more.” (III.ii.21-22). By saying this, Brutus acknowledges that he loves Caesar, but fears his power and that his main loyalty is to the people of Rome. Over time, Brutus gains Caesar’s trust yet at the same time is the one of the main conspirators involved in the assassination. Brutus feels guilty but honored at the same time. When things do not go as well as planned the people of Rome become enraged. Towards the end of the play, Brutus pleads to be killed, but is too honored for his peers to kill him, so he kills himself by impelling another’s sword. At this moment, everyone realizes how much Brutus loves his country. Over his dead body, Antony and Octavius pay him a respectful visit to say their proper goodbyes when Antony tells Octavius, “This was the most noblest Roman of them all.” (V.v.68). This definitely proves that Brutus is noble. His own enemies come up to …show more content…
There is foreshadowing of the misfortunes doomed to fall upon Caesar’s assassins. Antony calls to Ate, the Greek goddess of revenge, to release the fires of hell on the conspirators, “And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge, / With Atè by his side come hot from hell, / Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice / Cry ‘Havoc,’ and let slip the dogs of war, / That this foul deed shall smell above the earth / With carrion men, groaning for burial.” (III.i.270-275). This quote is signified toward Brutus and Cassius in foreshadowing their suicides when mentioning ‘Caesar’s revenge’ and ‘moaning for burial.’ Suicide at this time is not looked upon favorably, and also forbid them a noble and proper burial. ‘Carrion’ indicates that the body has been dead for a while and is rotting because of dishonorable burial. Later on when Brutus addresses the crowd at the forum, he apologizes for Caesar’s death, but also reminds the people that if Caesar lives the people become slaves. Then Antony takes over the eulogy and compares Caesar’s good attributes to those of Brutus, swaying the people to rebel against the conspirators by reading Caesar’s will which offers each a piece of silver, not knowing it is an exchange for their freedom. After the speech is over as Antony savors in his success, rioting in the background

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