A Tragic Hero In William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar

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All stories, whether it be an ancient classic or a children 's story, are based upon the actions of the hero and protagonist of it. In some cases the hero of a story is a classic hero who must overcome some great force to receive what he wants. In other stories the hero is a super hero who must use his or her super human strengths to save the day. However in other stories it is a tragic hero upon whom the story is written. A tragic hero is a royal or noble man or a woman who was well respected but possessed a character flaw that would eventually lead to his or her downfall. The play Julius Caesar written by William Shakespeare presents an excellent example of a tragic hero. Although the title of the play would imply that the hero of the story …show more content…
Born into the patricians, the highest class of rulers and distinguished families in the ancient Roman Republic, Brutus was from the day of his birth privileged and honored. As he grew older, Brutus became even more influential and distinguished due to his political leadership. His title and work as a senator won for him even more dignity and renown. At the time of Caesar 's return from defeating the sons of Pompey, Caesar and Brutus were very close friends. Caesar was at this time the most acclaimed and influential man in Rome. The fact that he was so close to Caesar made Brutus even more admired and commended among all the people of Rome. After his death, Antony spoke these words concerning Brutus, "This was the noblest Roman of them all/... His life was gentle and the elements/ So mixed in him that nature might stand up/ And say to all the world "This was a man"" (5.5.74-81). These words convey just how noble a man Brutus was. Mark Antony, a man who disliked Brutus enough to kill him, recognized that although he may not like him, he was a man of exceptional nobility, who was honored and respected by …show more content…
Brutus was not only a great man of noble background, but also a man honored by all who met him. His genuine concern for the Roman Republic and freedom for all the people is what won the respect of the common people. In addition to this, his steadfast devotion to Stoicism only increased the reverence that the people already had for him. This great esteem and admiration for Brutus is what impelled Cassius and the other conspirators to persuade Brutus to join them in their strategy and action. The conspirators knew that if Brutus would affirm to the people the validity of their abrupt and violent attack of Caesar, the people would trust in the actions of the conspirators and give to them their loyalty and trust. While the conspirators were still attempting to persuade Brutus to understand and join their position, Casca spoke to Cassius concerning Brutus, "O, he sits high in all the people 's hearts,/ And that which would appear offense in us/ His countenance, like richest alchemy,/ Will change to virtue and to worthiness" (1.3.161-165). The conspirators recognized the immensity of the influence Brutus had over the people due to their great respect for him and thus wished for his advocacy of their

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