A Tale Of Custard The Dragon Analysis

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In A Tale of Custard the Dragon, written by Ogden Nash, a little girl named Belinda had four very little pets to call her own, which included a kitten, mouse, dog and a dragon. Of these four pets, three of them are portrayed by the author to be incredibly brave and heroic; but, the last one was said to be a coward, and it was none other than Custard the Dragon. As the story progresses, the reader soon learns that there has been an intrusion by a pirate, and Melinda and all of the pets became terrified of the intruder. Then, even with all the brave pets in the house, Custard stood up tall and consumed the pirate. After Custard’s heroic scene, the other three pets made excuses such as, “I 'd been twice as brave if I hadn 't been flustered” (Nash …show more content…
For example, when Antigone tells Ismene that she plans on burying her brother, Ismene responds, “How could you dare, when Creon has expressly forbidden it?” (Sophocles 128). Sophocles uses harsh tone to portray Ismene’s astonishment towards Antigone for deciding to bury her brother, revealing her suspicion. He used specific phrases such as dare and expressly forbidden to illustrate astonishment and disapproval, establishing that Ismene didn’t believe that Antigone should defy Creon 's decree. Additionally, Ismene discusses burying Polynices and says, “I do not defy them; but I cannot act Against the State. I am not strong enough” (128). Sophocles portrays Ismene to be announcing her innocence by repeatedly pronouncing her loyalty to the state, shown through the repetition of the word I. Ismene is conveyed to not be morally strong enough to consider doing something honorable for her brother, when her own life is at risk. As the play progresses, Ismene 's weak morality becomes increasingly apparent through the use of strident tone and repetition. For instance, as Creon is sentencing Antigone to be killed, Ismene pleads, “But I am not ashamed to stand beside you Now in your hour of trial, Antigone” (141). A Compassionate tone is used through the words ashamed, now, stand beside you, and Antigone, …show more content…
For example, at the beginning of the play, Creon created a decree that declared, “[Polynices] is to have no grave, no burial, No mourning from anyone; it is forbidden” (131). Sophocles utilizes the repetition of the word no to create a caustic tone, conveying Creon’s disapproval on the burial of Polynices. Creon’s decree objecting to the burial of Polynices is created out of his own belief, and defies current moral standards already set by those with more power and before his reign; causing those of the town to form opinions and disagree with him. Additionally, Haemon tells Creon that the townspeople oppose killing Antigone, Creon responded,“Since when do I take my orders from the people of Thebes?” (146). Through harsh diction and the use of the words I, take, and orders, Creon is conveyed to be arrogant and hotheaded. Sophocles portrays Creon to have a pompous personality and believe he is almighty, that he can do no wrong and have no transgressions against himself; this is illustrated by the statement ‘since when do I take my orders’. Similarly, when Haemon is discussing Creon’s views, Creon proclaims, “To transgress Or twist the law to one’s own pleasure, presume To order where one should obey, is sinful” (144). Sophocles clearly states Creon’s morals and beliefs through the

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