A Summary On Native Americans

1120 Words 4 Pages
After reading chapter six-fifteen in the Schaefer text, my knowledge on Minorities and how they were treated in the world has expanded. Each chapter discusses a specific minority group and their problems with being in a diverse society. In chapter 6, I read about Native Americans who are considered the first Americans. They had been misunderstood and ill-treated by the conquerors for several centuries. Today, the Native American population is split between those on and off reservations and those who live in small towns or central cities (Schaefer, 156). I also learned about them economically. Since, the have a pattern of low-wage employment, they differ in three areas: their roles in tourism, casino gambling, and government employee. Educational …show more content…
Culture Shock is the experience of disorientation and confusion one feels when confronted with a different culture. Native Americans going through the different stages of culture shock also helped with my learning in this chapter. I learned about African Americans in chapter 7. Slavery was a big deal and for several decades, nearly one out of five people was Black and enslaved in the United States (Schaefer, 169). The Civil Rights movement gained momentum with a Supreme Court decision in 1954 that eventually desegregated the public schools, and it ended as a major force in Black America (pg. 178). The struggle to desegregate the schools was a big problem. The kids were separated in school by race. African American children were treated less and they did not have as much opportunities as others. One sociological term that helped me this chapter was the ideology of Racism. Racism is the ideology that one racial group is inferior to another and that therefore, unequal treatment is justified. African American was usually treated like they were not good enough and them being mistreated was not a problem for a while. The lecture mentioned how African Americans have been portrayed in roles as criminals, prostitutes, pimps, drug dealers, gang members and etc. This helped me understand the chapter because the way African Americans were treated was mentioned in the …show more content…
A lot of Latinos have issues with identity. Two-thirds of Latinos and Hispanics in the U.S. agree that they have a common culture that does not mean they feel they share a common name (Pg. 209). They would rather be identified by their origin or country. The sociological term that helped me understand this chapter was Ethnocentrism. Ethnocentrism plays a major role in our reaction to and relationship with members of our culture. We view the world in our own way when we are thinking ethnocentrically. Chapters 10 and 11 also talk about more minority groups. In chapter 10, I learned about Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans and in Chapter 11 I learned about Muslims and Arab Americans. In both chapters I learned about these specific groups and their immigrating to America. The immigration from Mexico is unique in several respects. It has been a continuous large-scale movement for most of the last-hundred years. Second, the proximity of Mexico encourages past immigrants to maintain strong cultural and language ties with their homeland through friends and relatives. The last point of uniqueness is the aura of illegality that has surrounded Mexican migrants (pg. 227). For Muslims and Arab Americans, immigration rates decline about 30 percent after 9/11. Today, metropolitan Detroit has by far the largest concentration of Arab Americans as well as Muslims

Related Documents