A Summary Of Broderick And Blewitt

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There are a variety of similarities in the content in both the Broderick and Blewitt text and the reading by Sylwester. Broderick and Blewitt open the chapter by explaining the intricate process of how the brain is formed and how it develops throughout gestation. Once the brain structure itself has formed in the womb, nerve cells called neurons begin to form (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). The brain sends information to the rest of the body through neurotransmitters that are housed in terminals at the end of axons (Sylwester, 1995). Sylwester gave an interesting analogy of how neurotransmitters communicate information. Sylwester explained that receptors are like a lock and neurotransmitters are like a key. Neurotransmitters are a specific …show more content…
The cerebral cortex is also one of the most important parts of the human brain. The cerebral cortex is responsible for “1) receiving, categorizing, and interpreting sensory information, 2) make rational decisions, and 3) activate behavioral responses.” (Sylwester, 1995). The left and right hemispheres are also responsible for performing different functions as well as assisting the other hemisphere with the functions they perform (Sylwester, 1995). The “right hemisphere processes negative aspects of emotion that lead to withdrawal behaviors (e.g., fear, disgust), while the left hemisphere processes positive aspects that lead to approaching behaviors (e.g., laughter, joy).” (Sylwester, 1995). An interesting point that Broderick and Blewitt make is that if one of the brain hemispheres is damaged in infancy, often times, the other hemisphere that is not damaged will take over the functions of the damaged hemisphere. However, if a brain hemisphere is damaged as an adult, it is less likely to …show more content…
Two of the main ideas included in Piaget’s Constructivist Theory is the process of assimilation and accommodation (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). When a child is confronted with a new stimulus, the child may use assimilation to make the stimulus fit into a category of something they already know (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). For example, if a family with a child has a dog and the child goes to a friend’s house that has a cat, the child may call the cat a dog because they have adapted that a furry, four-legged animal in the house is a dog. The friend’s parent may tell the child that animal is called a cat and not a dog. That child will then accommodate this information to gain a better understanding of the stimulus and will use this information the next time it is introduced to a similar stimulus (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). Piaget also brought forth the idea of object permanence (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). Object permanence asserts the idea that children, mainly infants, have a hard time understanding that objects still exist even if they cannot see them (Broderick & Blewitt, 2010). Object permanence could be an explanation for babies’ fascination with the game peek-a-boo. The

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