Hybridity In Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place

This literary caricature asserts that diaspora is not just an issue for colonised people living in England, but rather, a state of global displacement and identity confusion that has never been experienced before (Iyer 19). The cause of this universal placelessness and developing monoculture originates from technological advancements in communication and transportation which allows human beings to establish a sense of connectedness in today 's borderless world (Iyer 19). Although, Iyer states that this sense of connectivity is ultimately artificial, as global souls have no communal affiliations or obligations and instead, establish a fluid identity where the cultural internalisation of "one country 's not enough" (19). Hence, the contemporary …show more content…
This is evident as the author imaginatively constructs the reader as a global citizen who establishes artificial, and temporary, connections to the Caribbean nation of Antigua. Hence, the reader 's awareness of their role as a literary construction indicates that they have no real intention to internalise the culture or the story itself and, as a result, only engage in the country 's traditions to fulfil a superficial desire of being culturally connected and globally aware (Kincaid 4). Kincaid juxtaposes the reader 's frivolity against the archness of the narrator, who maintains the role of a "traditional passenger" (Iyer 19), struggling with their identity as a colonised person. This regression to the conventional understanding of hybridity indicates that Iyer 's concept of the global soul is not applicable to all colonised …show more content…
As a result of this impending departure, the narrator exploits any time spent on transportation, such as aeroplanes and cars, in order to highlight cultural and political issues that would otherwise remain unseen (Kincaid 6-7). However, these small windows that force the reader to view the monstrosities of the city, also separates them from the poverty and secondary living situations of their chauffeurs, as each pane of glass provides them with a sense of comfort and normality. This conscious segregation indicates that the reader is incapable of fully immersing themself in the culture as they "are used to this style of driving" (Kincaid 6-7), where they are always a passenger and bystander, never an active

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