A Reflection Of The Global Philosophy Of Religion

1028 Words 5 Pages
This class was precisely as I had suspected it to be, in that we would touch on various religions, their origins, their beliefs, and the philosophy behind these beliefs. I selected this class in the hope that I would broaden my frame of reference philosophically rather than religiously. And to be quite frank I dispensed with any curious thoughts about religious practices and their origins even before the class started. I make no claims to be an atheist or agnostic, I exist in pretty much the same way animals and trees do - oblivious to any spiritual dimensions in their existence. If anything I was much more akin to learn more philosophy from religion, more logic if you will. Even more I had a vested interest in Eastern philosophies, only because …show more content…
I learnt most about these two religion from the class textbook Global Philosophy of Religion. I learnt that in the practice of Hinduism the ultimate spiritual goal was Moksha, release of the soul from the vicious cycle of birth death and reincarnation, and back to the universal self; the Brahman. Also, I was fascinated to learn that in Hindu tradition, man is considered the master of his own fate. He is responsible for his own redemption from sin. A rather independent practice of religion almost devoid of gods. Having read that as a result of bad karma, one’s soul could be condemned to numerous cycles of reincarnation, I was quickly reminded as to how much I loathe the idea of life being a continuum rather than a journey with an end in sight. Which is why I still question reincarnation. Because even though good karma releases one’s soul back to the Universal self the Brahman, it seems rather frustrating to end numerous reincarnation only to rejoin Brahman as a new life. Is there no end in sight? Surely, who wants to live for an eternity? I mean regardless of what manifestation we take, bodily, spiritual or what forms have you? After ending our existence on earth does no one want peace? Simplistic arguments like we shall have no concept of time while existing everlastingly is yet another way of being cheated to live for …show more content…
He stated that Hinduism does entertain a certain level physics in that it recognized that we’re all made of matter, both animate and inanimate objects but exist at different frequencies I should add. This in fact got me wound up to the point that I researched on the weak link that exists between science and religion. I stumble upon a particularly interesting talk by Patricia Fara who explained that at one-point scientist were broken into two factions of belief. One faction believed that knowledge is power in the sense that if we gained knowledge about the world then we could understand God’s plan for the Universe, and the other half believed that if understood how the world works the we ourselves are gods because we could control how everything worked. All this knowledge I picked up as a result of one temple

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