A Raisin In The Sun And To Kill A Mockingbird By Lorraine Hansberry

1034 Words 5 Pages
Political literature is based on an author’s political way of thinking and how literature impacts society. In the article “Literature and Politics”, author John D. Lindberg says, “Any work of literature [...] the writer's personality has been shaped by the sociological and political environment of his time. Conversely, important works of literature [...] have brought about social and political change” (163). Both A Raisin in the Sun (from now on shown as Raisin) and To Kill a Mockingbird (from now on shown as Mockingbird) show strong examples of political literature. In Raisin, Lorraine Hansberry’s beliefs are shown through the perspective of a black family living in Chicago during the 1950’s. In Mockingbird, Harper Lee's beliefs are still …show more content…
It is a matter of the people of Clybourne Park believing [...] that for the happiness of all concerned that our Negro families [...] live in their own communities” (Hansberry 118). When Mr. Lindner goes to the Youngers place and is indirectly racist towards them it shows how racism was during that time. It shows how unfairly the Youngers are treated by white people and what they have to go through on a daily basis. Hansberry is able to accurately depict how black people were treated during the 50’s because she is black and has dealt with racism. Harper Lee also shows how black people are affected by racism in Mockingbird but isn't able to fully show how because it’s something that she has never experienced personally, something that she and Scout have in common. In Mockingbird when people start talking about Atticus after he accepts the case to defend Tom Robinson, Scout asks Atticus about it and he says, “You might hear some ugly talk [...] hold your head high [...] don’t you let ‘em get your goat” (Lee 87). Although the advice Atticus gives Scout is inspiring it misses the point regarding …show more content…
It states that black people are strong and they can rise above racism on their own. In Raisin when Mr. Lindner goes to the Youngers house to officially make sure that they don’t move into the all white neighborhood, Walter ends up standing up to him by saying, “We have decided to move into our house [...] we don’t want your money” (Hansberry 148). Walter ends up standing up for his family and essentially for his race. This shows representation to the black race as a whole. It tells readers that black people don’t need to wait for a white person to bravely admit that they don't mind the blacks and will help with their cause. This narrative however, is seen in Mockingbird. In Mockingbird when Atticus explains to Scout why he’s taking the Tom Robinson case he says, “If I didn’t I couldn't hold up my head in town [...] I could never ask you to mind me again” (Lee 86). Although Atticus defending Tom Robinson is morally the right thing to do, it still shows that “good” white people need to save black people from the “bad” white people. It says that in order for things to change regarding how black people are treated, whites are the only ones who are able to fix it, This erases the identify of the black community and shows no development what so ever to black characters. Lee doing this even further proves the fact that she is a white author trying to write about black problem that she can’t

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