A Negro Nation Within A Nation Analysis

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W.E.B DuBois was a prominent African-American activist during the twentieth century. During this time period, he fought for the end to racial segregation and desired to put a stop the undermining of black progress. Due to the continuous barriers that separated the black and white communities, DuBois was a huge advocate for the education of black people. Demonstrating persistence, DuBois continuously wrote his ideas in The Crisis and he also was a founder of the National Association Advancement of Colored People where he spoke against the political norms and questioned the intentions of white people. As a child, Du Bois was presented with harsh struggles such as poverty and having a single parent household with a mother …show more content…
As a way of having his voice heard De Bois began writing in order to captivate the black audience but critics believed his work to be very controversial. Du Bois wrote an issue named “A Negro Nation within a Nation”, where he inserted the idea that blacks were disliked by white Americans and they could use their power to turn America around. “White Americans do not like them… with the use of their use of economic power ...Negroes can develop in the United States.” Writing like this in such a prestigious newspaper allowed for people believe that they needed to take action rather than to continue to be inferior to white Americans. Du Bois founded The Crisis in 1910 where he sought to speak about race and social justice. “He saw The Crisis creating the seeds for a larger movement for civil rights.” The Crisis was basically the ignition which allowed blacks to question the society which they were living in. “It alone could teach Negro not only how to protest but how to …show more content…
It set an example for the moral conscious of America’s institutionalized racism. Through the history of the NAACP they “provided political support and direction to hundreds of black communities… in their local struggles against segregation.” Although the NAACP initially wasn’t able to get the approval for the Dyer Anti-Lynching Congress, he was still able to get spread the word about protection of black people against Jim Crow Laws which were laws enforcing racial segregation in the South. “Racial protest during the decade following World War I focused on securing anti-lynching

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