A Negro Nation Within A Nation Analysis

Improved Essays
W.E.B DuBois was a prominent African-American activist during the twentieth century. During this time period, he fought for the end to racial segregation and desired to put a stop the undermining of black progress. Due to the continuous barriers that separated the black and white communities, DuBois was a huge advocate for the education of black people. Demonstrating persistence, DuBois continuously wrote his ideas in The Crisis and he also was a founder of the National Association Advancement of Colored People where he spoke against the political norms and questioned the intentions of white people. As a child, Du Bois was presented with harsh struggles such as poverty and having a single parent household with a mother …show more content…
As a way of having his voice heard De Bois began writing in order to captivate the black audience but critics believed his work to be very controversial. Du Bois wrote an issue named “A Negro Nation within a Nation”, where he inserted the idea that blacks were disliked by white Americans and they could use their power to turn America around. “White Americans do not like them… with the use of their use of economic power ...Negroes can develop in the United States.” Writing like this in such a prestigious newspaper allowed for people believe that they needed to take action rather than to continue to be inferior to white Americans. Du Bois founded The Crisis in 1910 where he sought to speak about race and social justice. “He saw The Crisis creating the seeds for a larger movement for civil rights.” The Crisis was basically the ignition which allowed blacks to question the society which they were living in. “It alone could teach Negro not only how to protest but how to …show more content…
It set an example for the moral conscious of America’s institutionalized racism. Through the history of the NAACP they “provided political support and direction to hundreds of black communities… in their local struggles against segregation.” Although the NAACP initially wasn’t able to get the approval for the Dyer Anti-Lynching Congress, he was still able to get spread the word about protection of black people against Jim Crow Laws which were laws enforcing racial segregation in the South. “Racial protest during the decade following World War I focused on securing anti-lynching

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Malcolm X Essay

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The movement frequently protests, police killings of black people, raising the concerns of racial profiling, fighting against police brutality, and racial inequality in the United States. Malcolm X triggered the start of the Black Lives Matter movement fifty years later because he advocated for black pride and empowerment. Dr. King was an integrationist preaching for blacks and whites to work together in civilization. The BLM movement has emphasized sit-ins in the spirit of MLK due to the racism and issues in the United States. The Black Lives Matter movement protested on violence and racism, but people refer to the fact that All Lives should matter.…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As the leader of the blue-ribbon committee, it is my job to expose the race relations occurring in the country right now. The relationship between African Americans and whites is very toxic. At the end of the Civil War, several opportunities were granted to African Americans such as voting rights, citizenship and the abolition of slavery however, African Americans never felt that these rights were granted to them. The problems that need to be addressed are the lack of integration of African Americans in the south and the dehumanizing cycle of manual labor for African Americans. Our job is to provide to provide equal opportunities to African Americans.…

    • 1026 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    DuBois tried to explain that Black people need to be part of social institutions and not create their own. Therefore, end up disagreeing with Booker T. Washington for ideas that race could work the best together apart. Which in terms a huge problem to DuBois because he believes that Booker T. Washington was content with the slow social progression of Blacks. In 1903, he published The Souls of Black Folk in which he goes into specific detail about his interaction with Book T. Washington and the discontentment of his ideology and the method he takes to implant…

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Black Studies Movement

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Black Studies Movement was a momentous period that encouraged many to look at the education that was provide to them and rewrite history to become the revolution of Black Studies that it is today. The approach is that we must now focus on the importance of the pure African worldview, to go back and meet the needs of African people to acknowledge the mis-education that was given, to now develop the basic understanding of what is to be African American and to deconstruct the western society history. This approach was both articulated in Azibo,” The Fundamental Role of Culture and the African Centered Worldview,” and Meyer “, Optimal Theory and the Philosophical and Academic Origins of Black…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the reconstruction period is when blacks started to gain a voice in the government. This upset whites and made them fear for their superiority in society. This is why they created black codes. Black codes restricted blacks from learning to read or write. They couldn't go to the same public facilities as whites.…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Baldwin wrote a book, highlighting all his rough and unpleasant experiences to teach others how doing wrong had hurt his family and how right will soon make things just again. On the other hand, Marshall took a political approach by fighting for desegregation in the courtroom and uniting different races so that they can live together peacefully. Through their writing, both Baldwin and Haygood depict how racial discrimination was a direct result of the limited rights of African Americans in society and how they took a stance for right over…

    • 1226 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Washington and DuBois: Words for the Blacks from the Blacks Even after slavery had ended, America was still facing two substantial problems: racism and segregation. These two issues caused turmoil amongst the country; whites and blacks were fighting one another. Both were fighting for different reasons: whites were fighting to keep their superiority and blacks were fighting for equality. Several blacks took to writing and peaceful riots to express what their people must do to deal with the abuse that they were receiving. Two very influential blacks were Booker T. Washington and W.E.B.…

    • 1132 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What he meant by this was that the African Americans should use what’s at their disposal to make things better and not try to acquire things that seem too far fetched. Washington was very much for African Americans getting out of the pit they have been in for so long. Washington came with a plan which called for “industrial education, conciliation of the south, and submission and silence as to civil and political rights” “Booker T. Washington and Others, 1903” in [Reading the American Past] edited by Michael Johnson (New York: Bedford/St. Martin, 2012), 117. These new views startled the nation to hear a African Americans support the submission of black rights.…

    • 1652 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    As the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Carmichael was the manifestation of the growing frustration with the lack of progress achieved under the leadership of Martin Luther King Jr. Carmichael’s political philosophy accentuated the importance of racial solidarity and the development of black social and cultural institutions with the key objective of nurturing and promoting black interests. More importantly, Carmichael called for the reinforcement of black values through the emergence of black pride. He alludes to these principles in Toward Black Liberation insisting that “ Our concern for black power addresses itself directly to this problem, the necessity to reclaim our history and our identity from the cultural terrorism and depredation of self-justifying white guilt”(Jones, 270). Carmichael’s attitude embodies a thoroughly disparate approach towards civil rights activism. His emphasis on “ Black Power” in this passage is a paragon of the growing divergence between the two factions in modern black political thought.…

    • 1782 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Washington influenced many African Americans, he was also seen as a betrayer to others. This is because of his speech held in Atlanta known as, “The Atlanta Compromise.” In this speech, Booker talked about how African Americans should accept their segregation, and to work hard until the day comes where the white community accepts them. This angered several people, including famous figure, W.E.B. Du Bois. He argued that Booker should be fighting for the right to earn equality, and not just accept disfranchisement.…

    • 704 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays