A Line Of Corruption Analysis

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A Line of Corruption: Turn of the Screw 1898, England, a society of hardened social classes in which people were engrained into the class in which they were born. Henry James, a wealthy writer and philosopher moved to England from America…In his book Turn of the Screw, Henry James warns that an inattentive upper class is blinded by their own prejudice towards the lower class causes a chain of corruption. Quint is the person with the lowest status in the novel yet he succeeds in creating Jessel into a social outcast and causing much suffering. Jessel was a “lady,” while Quint was “dreadfully below,” in terms of class. Jessel did not realize Quint’s motive to use her as a puppet, consequently she “didn’t forbid him.” In Jessel’s mind, Quint …show more content…
Just as Quint was always with Jessel, he “had been perpetually” been with Miles. When Quint was with Miles he acted much too “free.” Quint was free in the sense that his sexual being was unrestrained when he was with Miles. He also loved to “play,” with Miles, indicating some sexual games together. Quint was “knowledgable about [the loss of innocence],” he realized that was tainting Miles. He seemed to always be “looking for” Miles, so it was as if Miles was incapable of escape from the presence of Quint. The governess acknowledges the “effect” that Quint has on Miles but does nothing to prevent against the corruption. Quint was the father that Miles never had, and so Miles was trusting of Quint. Miles was also an obedient child, “a beautiful little boy,” until Quint spends an extensive amount of time with Miles. After the expulsion the governess asks Miles why he was expelled, in which he replies that he said things to “those [he] liked.” Since he said things to the boys he liked there is a high probability that he said homosexual things to others. The homosexual language is a byproduct of his time with …show more content…
Miles is the male of the household which makes him the dominant, capable figure of the household however the governess holds the most authoritative power. The governess has crude sexual thoughts which then transfer to innocent “little Miles.” The governess “admired [towers],” and “had fancies about them,” showing the sensual thoughts that Mile’s caretaker had. Not only does the governess idealize towers, she describes Quint as “erect.” The governess romanticizes Miles, calling him “incredibly beautiful.” Caretakers have influential roles and if they have sensual thoughts then it will translate to the children. When the governess talked to Miles she “dropped to [her] knees,” which was in a sense inviting carnal acts. Miles does not reject the governess’s advances because he is curious. Children have natural “curiosity of [their] youth, which shows why Miles doesn’t do anything about the governess. In addition the governess is manager of the household, and she can ben the obedient children to her will. The relationship between the governess and Miles was much too “free,” when it should have been hard and rigid. The loose relationship allowed for sexual freedom between the governess and Miles. The lack of a barrier between the two allows for a sensual act between Miles and the governess which is implied when Miles shouts in “jubilation.” The governess encourages the blooming

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