George Washington A Hero's Farewell Analysis

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Times may be changing, but traditions hold true. Said best by the first father of our country, “Government is not reason; it is not eloquence; it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant, and a fearful master.” President George Washington understood the discipline, consistency, and lucidity requisite to consolidate a growing nation. Undeniably, his sharp mind and innate governance sustained a widespread sense of triumph, pride, and purpose among citizens that we Americans have long since faced for ourselves. Later disobeying Washington’s principles of rule, those who followed in his footsteps have consequentially led our country to its downward demise.

From 1775-1783, colonists battled for their freedom. Soldiers at war not only
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("A Hero 's Farewell." 91; "Farewell" 74). John Adams, however, failed to remain faithful to Washington’s insight. Although a proficient president, is remembered for the lasting disgrace he brought upon his name. From 1797-1801, Adams grew uncertain and unsteady. Constantly second-guessing his judgment and wavering from his promises, he spent his presidency tarnishing his good name. Adams’ uncertainty ultimately led to the capture of more than three hundred United States ships over France’s resentment regarding “Jay’s Treaty” in the XYZ Affair. Soon after, Adams would join an alliance with Britain, who was responsible for the death of fifty thousand American soldiers a short fifteen years prior. Tensions rose throughout his four years as Adams, the Federalist President, resisted his Democratic Republican Vice President, Thomas Jefferson. Losing the election for a second term, Adams furiously left the polls, leaving the country in yet another party’s hands. ("John Adams.", …show more content…
The Twelfth Amendment of the United States Constitution detailed a new process of elections. Previously, the candidate receiving the majority of the votes would be named president, and the second most voted would be in office as vice president. The new process refines the elections to avoid clashing parties holding office.

Fast-forwarding fifty-seven years, President Lincoln faced greater difficulties. As the Civil War was underway, Lincoln was powerless in unifying the disconnected nation. Northern Democrats, Southern radicals, and Republicans contravened, showing no mercy. The effects of political parties shown to be detrimental, and Lincoln, and Republican and advocate of equal opportunity and freedom, operated as he saw fit. Savior of the states, Lincoln abolished slavery, overrode petty successions, and successfully reinstated harmony amid

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