A Great And Horrible Beauty Analysis

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A Great And Terrible Beauty

As a child, the first stories we are told are tales of magic and wonder of beautiful and brave princesses, the usual stories that let our imaginations thrive and explore. They keep our hopes and dreams alive, and can also provide an escape from the depressing world we all live in. In A Great And Terrible Beauty, the author Libba Bray builds a world where Gemma and her group of friends can only visit in their dreams. Gemma and her friends are whisked away to the Realms, where they can forget the troubles of their own life. The novel is very powerful based on the character 's development, the settings and the power of choices as the central theme. The connection between characters and their location in a novel
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With the power that Gemma has, she had to understand the right and wrong of it. She had to make the right decisions or face the consequences that no one imagine. Gemma has to control from having her visions and the power from the realms. “There are no safe choices. Only other choices.” (Bray 267). During the Victorian society, women were not meant to have too many choices, because it overwhelms them and every choice has consequences. Although the setting is Victoria England, but Bray make the characters, especially, GEmma, is anything but a Victorian. Gemma says, “I don’t know yet what power feels like. But this is surely what it looks like, and I think I’m beginning to understand why those ancient women had to hide in cave,” (Bray 207). Parents during the Victorian then wanted their children to behave properly and predictably. Instead of being a young Victorian lady, Gemma seems like a twenty first century girl dropped into 1895 with her desire for independence and ironic commentaries. The powers of choices is what the adults feared most of their children. We, as a society, want to know that we are making the right choice, but every choice we make carries with it a sense of of personal responsibility and a degree of insecurity. “Because you don’t notice the light without a bit of shadow. Everything has both dark and light. You have to play with it till you get it exactly right,” …show more content…
Though the power she had challenges her and it also changes her for the better. Because the decision making process is never easy, we all seems to decide on things that comes to our minds first. In order to make the book more interesting Libba Bray decides to add the supernatural elements to the novel to set it apart from other novels. The magic and power of the realms made it so that once we enter, we do not want to leave.The Realms are a place where anything seems possible, all that we desire can be ours and we can achieve our goals. Not only is this book interesting to read, but can learn of morality from it. The power of making the right

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