A Girl Like Me Analysis

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Although Mead does not explicitly account for inequalities among race, class, or gender, his conceptualization of the “me” constitutes a survival mechanism for that is used for individuals to be accepted (Mead,1934). The more recent version of the Clarks Doll test, 2005 documentary A Girl Like Me by Kiri Davis, supports the argument that African-Americans, especially dark-skinned, have an overdeveloped “Me” compared to light-skinned and Whites. In the beginning stages of socialization, African-American children are taught that they are inferior to their lighter counterparts especially white people (Hill, 2002). Unfortunately, this has caused Black children to suffer mentally and psychologically which in turns affect their self-esteem. African-American …show more content…
The generalized other characterizes “black” as being associated with negative stigmas such as being ignorant, hyper-sexual, and ghetto. African-Americans women feel that they must defy the stereotypical assumptions therefore they consciously suppress their “I” to fit in and be treated fairly by all individuals. Mead would argue that African-American women must govern themselves according to the social context (Mead, 1934). That is, women of the African-American community learn how to code switch, which suggests that people adapt to their environment and social interactions. Light-skinned African-Americans do not have to consider the generalized other as much as their counterparts because lighter skin is more socially acceptable where darkness needs an explanation. While Mead offers a micro focus on colorism and examines how the individual is affected by larger society, Du Bois’ perspective analyzes how colorism plays to the benefit of light-skinned, African-American …show more content…
The more self-esteem a person has the more, they will appreciate themselves and not perpetuate self-hatred to themselves and others. Unless African-Americans continue to articulate colorism, it will continue to perpetuate the stereotypes, division, and structural racism within the African-American community. To start the healing process, African-Americans need to acknowledge the power of advertising and how the media frames the African-American identity. Within recent years, more interracial couples have been advertised on TV and African-American women with natural

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