A Day In The Life Of Ancient Rome Character Analysis

809 Words 4 Pages
Today there stands a city that has had thousands of years preserved underneath its streets. Archeologists and historians are working together to find out the story of this city, but often times the translation of academic findings to the rest of the world is not fulfilled. In popular culture today there are many gross interpretations of roman life that misguide the common consumer of information to get a terrible understanding of what roman life was like. There is a man though that is trying to change that and his name is Alberto Angela. In his book, “A Day In The Life Of Ancient Rome”, Angela attempts to show Rome as it truly was mean to be. Angela does a superb job at this but his book falls into some serious traps such as poor writing, …show more content…
Angela writes such long depictions of things that sometimes the story devolves into some strange tangent that has no relation to what he was originally talking about. Some of these tangents are small interjections that in the end actually provide a better sense of Rome than before. A good example of one his tangents is when he goes in depth for a short paragraph about how the roman tradition of phallic worship was passed down to us through the centuries (114). Note that the previous few paragraphs were about opening up a shop. The added detail at first may seem like it detracts from the overall progression of the narrative, but at second glance Alberto is trying to create a stronger connection for the reader. It feels awkward reading it, but in the end it does not detract in the …show more content…
At times it can be a little much, but Angela includes so many descriptions of things that the reader has to feel like Rome is right in front of his eyes. And regardless of the detractor on page 245, the Rome that Angela does present feels more real than any other Rome in popular culture. The details that he goes into and the personal human interactions that he describes adds an element that is quit unique. It is not the actual actions like someone did this or someone did that, but rather in the events that took place as whole. The description of the cattle market was a good show of how Alberto Angela handled this (146). In this section he included descriptions of how women were treated, counting methods, and trade practices all into one colorful narrative that really breathed life into the otherwise dry description of those things. This is why this book succeeds. Not because of the descriptions themselves, but because Alberto’s Rome feels more real than any other because of the human element he adds to

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