I Never Promised You A Rose Garden: A Literary Analysis

Great Essays
American literature both fiction and non-fiction are important to today’s modern student because they both offer lessons to teach the students. Fiction offers the student a more entertaining way to learn a lesson or about a specific time in history. Non-fiction offers the student a factual lesson in the form of a story. In the fictional novel I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, a young girl named Deborah is taken to a mental hospital for her schizophrenia by her parents. Deborah at the time is unaware she has a mental illness, she believes she was given a special power to enter into a different world, Yr. Throughout the novel, Deborah struggles to find what is real ad what is imaginary. She visits with doctors and other patients in the ward to help overcome her illness. I Never Promised You a Rose Garden offers the lesson of how a mental patient adapts and overcomes the fear they experience, as well as, how the family and people around them experience fear for the patient and support them in their battle to mental health. …show more content…
This novel was a fictionalized autobiography about schizophrenia. As a child, Greenberg created an imaginary world in an attempt to find peace from her fears created by World War II. Her imaginary world became her sanctuary and he prison because she could not escape it. However, by age thirty-two Greenberg was able to escape the interior world and write about her battle. Her novel, I Never Promised You a Rose Garden, became a bestseller. By this time, she had already graduated from American University. She majored in anthropology and English. She married Albert Greenberg and had two sons. Greenberg published many other works of writing, including novels, short stories and essays. She also taught at the Colorado School of Mines as an anthropology professor; however, she later became a creative writing

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Actually, this room with the yellow wallpaper is Jane’s prison; the readers can feel it by the tone of the narration, which gradually becomes desperate. However, Jane does not make any tangible attempts to leave the room: she looks for a solution inside it. It means that she does not count on changing the outside world; her intentions reflect only some timid endeavors to convey her anxiety to all other people. Also, as mentioned, this story is in many ways personal: Gilman herself suffered from improper treatment of a male doctor, similarly to the protagonist of her story. Thereby, “Gilman's life affected her writings, both the nonfiction, which gained her fame, and the fiction, especially "The Yellow Wallpaper" (Berman 2).…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cameron Jace in the book, Insanity (Mad in Wonderland), retells Alice in Wonderland in captivating way. Jace allures his audience by keeping Alice’s past a mystery and only revealing her past through her dreams once her mother and sisters visits her at the Radcliffe Lunatic Asylum. Jace’s purpose is to entertain his audience by bringing in new a Alice to life. Jace writes in a nefarious tone for Alice in Wonderland fans. Insanity is a marvelous book about a girl from an Asylum trying to figure what is reality and imagery, with a serial killer 's help name Pillar the Killer she decides to follow her heart, and try to save the world, even though it seems a little mad.…

    • 811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Gathering is a young adult book where you see the life of a teenage girl question everything happening in her beloved little town. Maya needs to know what happened to Serena and why it’s being covered up because it is keeping her from moving on. Rafe up right changes everything that Maya has ever believed about her biological family. He also makes Maya curious in her past and why her biological mom picked her brother and not her mom. In conclusion, the theme of curiosity is the main theme in the gathering because the author intertwines it completely with every main storyline in the…

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There is nothing so dangerous, so fascinating, to a temperament like yours it is a false and foolish fancy. Can you not trust me as a physician when I tell you so?" This piece of evidence explains that what he was saying to his wife was, "Listen I'm the doctor I can tell when you are getting better just listen to me!" Unfortunately, he really didn’t understand what she was going through. This is the story of how a woman who had postpartum depression and how her husband John didn’t understand what the problem was and how it affected her.…

    • 748 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Parent doctors worry too much about their family member, and could falsify the test results if they thought it could be of any danger to their patient. In the novel, not once is there an indication of abnormal results. There is no hard evidence that Madeline has SCID. In the beginning of the novel, Madeline was too used to the life she was living, there had to be an aspect of change to make the book interesting, and the aspect is that her mother lied to her. In the middle of the book, Madeline runs outside to see if Olly is okay, after being punched by his abusive father, and if she was sick, she would have likely had a reaction to something in the air.…

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Virginia Woolf Psychology

    • 976 Words
    • 4 Pages

    When authors write novels they are relinquishing part of themselves to their audience. After Virginia Woolf’s suicide many psychologists analyzed her novels and diagnosed her with manic-depressive and bipolar disorder. In To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf’s applies psychological concepts, such as unconscious motives, oedipus complex, and the stream of consciousness, to give us greater insight into her own ways of thinking, so that we can be more tolerant of those with mental illness. Throughout the novel it becomes abundantly clear that Woolf has unconsciously made Mrs. and Mr. Ramsay her parents. Upon beginning the novel we are led to believe that Mrs. Ramsay is the protagonist of the story, but come part two we are given some terrible news,…

    • 976 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the short story, “The Yellow Wallpaper”, Charlotte Perkins Gilman uses her personal life to create a fictional narrative about the treatment of women in late 1800’s, mental illnesses in the 1800’s along with how far the human mind can go before it snaps. Why does Charlotte Perkins Gilman expose her life through the lines of her story? She wrote this story to show how the yellow wallpaper itself represents the isolation of women. Gilman displays this by indirectly stating a women’s position in marriage and how the gender roles leave them in a child like state that prevents women from developing. The protagonist is constantly alone and forbidden by husband and doctor to leave.…

    • 1524 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Kleptomania Case Study

    • 342 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Psychodynamic perspective talks about a person's unconscious desire ,needs, and conflicts. Kleptomania can be a defense to one's unconscious desires and needs the case study in (The journal of psychiatry and neurological sciences) proves that. The young lady involved was raised by her grandmother even though her mother lived in the same house as her. She needed love from her mother but she never gave it to her she soon began to see love as an object. Her kleptomania flared up whenever she did not feel loved.…

    • 342 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    This represents the narrator because she feels as if she is in captivity like the woman in the wallpaper. The woman’s prison is the wallpaper, and the narrator’s prison is the room due to the rest therapy. The narrator’s brain is forced to create this dark other self to stimulate her mind after going so long without doing anything that supposedly would make her condition worse. The rest therapy was suppose to cure her condition and get her back to normal, but taking the narrator from her life and family and friends was not the correct treatment. If the physicians, including her husband, would have listened to her, she would not have become mentally unstable and transformed into the dark woman that lived deep within her subconscious.…

    • 1093 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One may say that a woman’s work is never done. Many American women grow up with this embedded in their minds and feel it to be true Charlotte Perkins Gilman, published in 1892 in the New England Magazine, “The Yellow Wallpaper,” argues that after being observed by a physician for severe and continuous nervous breakdowns and beyond, that not using the remnants of intelligence that remained left her near the borderline of utter mental ruin. Gilman successfully built her narratives in the short story, which was essentially intended to be a letter to the doctor that diagnosed her, by employing emotional appeals into a story exaggerating her feelings while unable to express her creativity, this effect is best created by the use of complex symbols,…

    • 1229 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays