A Comparison Of Capitalism In The Jungle By Upton Sinclair

1650 Words 7 Pages
America is known as the land of opportunity. In the past as well as the present, immigrants have traveled to this country with dreams of fulfilling their own goals – home ownership, raising a family, or having a good career, for example. This view of America, however, may be more fiction than fact. In The Jungle, written by Upton Sinclair, views are established of an America completely opposite of the views of the incoming foreigners and even the citizens already living in the country. Upton Sinclair describes the capitalism of America being evil, an obstacle of advancement for the common American. Likewise, he promotes socialism as being good, the solution to the corruption of capitalism. The United States is a country founded on the belief …show more content…
This industrial age was the period of time in which Americans brought about new methods of product production, using new inventions and innovations of the time. Business owners took advantage of every opportunity to increase their wealth. This can be considered corruption in businesses as it often involved dishonest practices such as bribing the government to avoid business laws, as well as, more importantly, taking advantage of the large working class. During this time, there was a group of people known as “muckrakers” who attempted to expose this corruption in the big industrial businesses through literary works. One of the best known muckrakers was the author Upton Sinclair. Sinclair used his novel The Jungle to expose the corruption and unsanitary conditions of the meat-packing industry. He gave honest and sometimes gruesomely vivid descriptions of all of the working conditions that would concern any social reformers of the time (McChesney). However, the description of Chicago 's Packingtown only took up part of Sinclair 's book. Most of his writing focused on the difficulty of an immigrant achieving his “American …show more content…
In The Jungle, Sinclair uses a fictional Lithuanian family as his demonstration of the evils of American society. Jurgis, the head of the family, is confronted with obstacle after obstacle in Chicago, Illinois. Upton Sinclair uses Jurgis as his example of how capitalistic society cruelly prevents people from achieving their goals. Jurgis and his family are a representation of the thousands of immigrants who came to America during the Industrial Revolution. They, like the immigrants found in reality, traveled to the United States from their homelands with the hopes of starting a new life. Jurgis and his wife, Ona, left Lithuania upon the assumption that life would be better in the United States; they even had hopes of striking it rich like a friend who had already immigrated. Their hopes for America are demonstrated in a simple and straight forward manner in the

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