Dewey A Common Faith Analysis

700 Words 3 Pages
In “Debating religious Liberty and Discrimination” Anderson, Corvino, and Girgis present their positions regarding controversial issues such as affirmative action, same sex marriage and the existence of a supernatural celestial essence. These compelling social issues are deliberated through empirical, and prudential questions essentially concerning discrimination, tolerance, and liberty. The book divides the author’s dueling opinions accordingly. While Corvino embraces a liberal perspective on the argument Anderson and Girgis collectively argue on behalf of the opposing side of the spectrum, with certain points of commonality. In “A Common Faith” Dewey critically assesses the role of religion in government. Further, he proposes that government …show more content…
The scientific method has revolutionized the way in which humans assess the supernatural. According to Dewey, an upsurge of faith in intelligence further promotes intelligence as a possible driving force for advancement. When addressing human intelligence Dewey states that, “We should at least ask ourselves how much of the existing situation is due to the fact that religious factors of experience have been drafted into supernatural channels and thereby loaded with irrelevant encumbrances” (p.25). Here he elaborates on the unnecessary entrenchment of the supernatural to the pursuit of knowledge. Nevertheless, religion retains a monopoly on supernatural concepts, which obtrude on certain inherent natural experiences that exist within religious …show more content…
Corvino’s approach to religion and government closely emulates Dewey’s. The incorporation of other faiths in his argument exhibits multiplicity in religious experiences, which is lacking in A-G’s argument. Religion is multifaceted, although it may promote certain fundamental goods, such as answers to existential questions. It further promotes deviant undertakings that fail to advance civil liberties and society, for instance, the Salem witch trials. In his description of an adequate relationship between religion and the state Corvino states that, “Perhaps it means not that government should promote “true” religion but that it should support any sincere attempt to grapple with fundamental questions and live according to the dictates of conscience” (pg. 63-64). Here he promotes that a religious theme isn’t necessary in government to encourage charitable behaviors, which foster social welfare. While Corvino supports the protection of religious speech, and expression, moreover promotes religious inclusion, he argues that extensive religious liberties infringe on social liberties of minority

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