A Cartload Of Shoes Analysis

1293 Words 6 Pages
As United States citizens, born and raised in a privileged, first world country, we do not fully comprehend the pain of true suffering. This is highly debatable, as many in this nation have experienced poverty, death in their family, homelessness, and other struggles, but digesting the entire nauseating concept of suffering associated with the Holocaust is nearly impossible. The countless written works devoted to this tragedy are known for their ability to provoke thought and test morals. Despite the striking emotions both “Refugee Blues” by WH Auden and “A Cartload of Shoes” by Abraham Sutzkever invoke and the themes they cover, Sutzkever’s eyewitness account draws more reality and human life relation into the pot of literature. …show more content…
In countries such as Syria and Iraq, there are no technical genocides occurring, but the civilians of these nations are being terrorized and murdered daily. Nonetheless, the administration for our nation, founded by immigrants, has decided these people’s lives aren’t worth the trouble, and we refuse to allow them to leave their oppressed areas by not granting them asylum. This poem causes me to pulse with anger toward those who don’t value certain human lives based on their religious identities. By the time I read, “Went down the harbour and stood upon the quay, / Saw the fish swimming as if they were free,” I was boiling. People do not deserve to live in a place where they feel they have no freedom, and a place where they fear for survival daily. We are all human, and we all deserve the right to happiness. Abraham Sutzkever, author of “A Cartload of Shoes” provides a completely different perspective of the Holocaust. Sutzkever, a Yiddish poet who grew up in Vilna, used personification and his personal experiences to describe the horrors of genocide. He was forced into the Vilna Ghetto with his wife in 1941, and he suffered the loss of his mother and infant son by the hands of a Nazi. He managed to write poetry and preserve it during World War II, despite the difficulties associated with being a Jewish person. Sutzkever desired to help people understand the horrific acts human beings …show more content…
Abraham Sutzkever spoke from the heart and his own personal experience while drafting his poetry, and I can feel his suffering through his words. “She kept them for the Sabbath / Her favourite pair,” bleeds with grief and emptiness, and it is a feeling most people can relate to. WH Auden is not capable of achieving true emotion because he did not experience the horrors of the Holocaust as one of the persecuted. Despite the fact he was gay, he grew up in the comfort of the United Kingdom, and he did not lose large numbers of his friends and family to religious injustice. He was not able to witness the Holocaust in the same way as Sutzkever, and this enables Sutzkever’s poem to reign superior in terms of powerful Holocaust

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