Assignment On Piaget's Theory

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Writing Assignment 3 Have you ever wondered what exactly goes through an infant's brain, or how their brain is developed? There is one man who claims to know the answer. Piaget's theory states that just as our physical bodies have structures that enable us to adapt to the world, we also build mental structures that help us adapt. To explain his idea, he developed a process that includes 4 stages. These stages are the sensorimotor stage, preoperational stage, concrete operational stage, and the formal operational stage. According to Piaget, the sensorimotor stage begins at birth and concludes at age 2. In this stage, the infant will begin to put together an understanding of the world by connecting sensory experiences with physical actions. …show more content…
This stage ranges from age 7 to age 11. In this period, the child can now reason logically about concrete events and classify objects into different sets (Santrock, 2001). While children are still processing very concrete thoughts, they will begin to learn to use their logical reasoning to come up with an explanation. They are much more adaptable, and their struggle with egocentrism and animism begins to disappear. There will also be a better understanding of conservation during this stage. Piaget suggests that during this time children will have an intrigued interest in other people's thoughts, feelings, and …show more content…
Why doesn't he or most other developmental specialists study the development of adulthood? From what I have researched, it is said that by the time we reach early adulthood, our bodies are at their peak of growth. However, a few psychologists have suggested a fifth stage to Piaget's theory called the post-formal operational thinking. In this stage, "decisions are made based on situations and circumstances, and logic is integrated with emotion as adults develop principles that depend on contexts" (Richards, 2014). According to these references, the peaking age for adulthood development is around the age of 35. So, really the only changes that occur in this stage would be the ability to cognitively handle emotionally charged situations and apply them. We now come to the question of "is this fifth stage really necessary?". In my opinion, I do not think this is necessarily vital to the developmental process. It should be understood that the more experiences a human goes through, the more that will shape their brain's performance. Therefore, there shouldn't have to be a fifth stage added to Piaget's theory, since this is the only area of the brain that will see

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